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-^. 



AB30 
1960/61 




NEW HAVEN 
COLLEGE 



Catalog 

i960 
1961 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/newhavencolleg196061newh 




LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN 



NEW HAVEN 
COLLEGE 

51 PROSPECT STREET 

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT 



Catalog 
1960-1961 



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Contents 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR FOR 1960-1961 4 

BOARDS AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF .... 7 

PURPOSES AND HISTORY 9 

GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

NEW HAVEN COLLEGE PROGRAMS OF STUDY . . 25 

The Evening Credit Programs 

Calendar 26 

Tuition and Fees 32 

The Summer Session 36 

Associate in Science Programs 38 

Bachelor of Science Programs 47 

Description of Courses ........ 55 

The Daytime Cooperative Program 71 

Calendar 72 

Tuition and Fees 77 

Programs of Study 78 

Description of Courses 79 

The Daytime Engineering Program 81 

Calendar 82 

Tuition and Fees 84 

Programs of Study 84 

Description of Courses 86 

The College-Community Programs 91 

THE DIVISION OF SPECIAL STUDIES 93 

THE SCHOOL OF EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT . . 101 

THE READING CENTER 107 

NEW HAVEN COLLEGE FACULTY Ill 

GENERAL INDEX 125 



Calendar of All Degree Programs 

1960-1961 



ECP Evening Credit Program 

DEP Daytime Engineering Program 

C Daytime Cooperative Program 

ALL Applies to all programs 



1960 



ECP 


Registration for current and foimer 


Monday-Saturday, 






students 


12 Noon 


January 4-16 


ALL 


Placement Examination*: 








English examinations 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


January 11 




Psychological examination 


Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 


January 12 




Mathematics examination 


Tuesday, 8:15 p.m. 


January 12 


ECP 


Registration for new students 


Wednesday-Saturday, 








12 Noon 


January 20-23 


ECP 


Tuition due on or before 


Saturday, 12 Noon 


January 23 


C 


Coop Group B Tuition due on or before 


Saturday, 12 Noon 


January 23 


C 


Coop Group B Work period begins 


Monday 


January 25 


C 


Coop Group A Classes begin— Tuition 








due 


Monday 


January 25 


DEP 


Classes begin— Tuition due 


Monday 


February 1 


ECP 


Classes begin 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


February 1 


ECP 


Last date for admission of former 








students and transfers 


Friday 


February 19 


ALL 


Washington's Birthday (holiday) 


Monday 


February 22 


DEP 


Spring Recess 


Saturday-Sunday 


March 26- 
April 3 
April 1 


C 


Coop Group A Classes end 


Friday 


C 


Coop Group B Work period ends 


Monday 


April 4 


C 


Coop Group A Work period begins 


Friday 


April 1 


C 


Coop Group B Classes begin 


Monday 


April 4 


ALL 


Good Friday (holiday) 


Friday 


April 15 


ECP 


Final examinations 


Tuesday-Tuesday 


May 17-24 


DEP 


Final examinations 


Monday-Friday 


May 23-27 


C 


Memorial Day (holiday) 


Monday 


May 30 


ALL 


Placement Examinations: 








English examinations 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


June 6 




Psychological examination 


Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 


June 7 




Mathematics examination 


Tuesday, 8:15 p.m. 


[ une 7 


C 


Coop Group A Work period ends 


Friday 


une 10 


C 


Coop Group B Classes end 


Friday 


une 10 


ALL 


Commencement 


Sunday 


'une 12 


ECP 


Summer Session Registration period 


Tuesday, Wednesday 


June 14-15 


ECP 


Summer Session Tuition due on or 








before 


Wednesday 


June 15 


ECP 


Summer Session Classes begin 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


June 20 


ECP 


Independence Day (holiday) 


Monday 


July 4 


ECP 


Summer Session First Term final 








examinations 


Monday 


July 25 


ECP 


Summer Session Second Term classes 








begin 


Wednesday 


July 27 


ECP 


Summer Session Second Term final 








examinations 


Monday 


August 29 


C 


Coop Group A Last day of application 


Friday 


August 12 


C 


Coop Group B Last day of application 


Friday 


August 26 


ALL 


Placement Examinations: 








English examinations 


Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 


August 23 




Psychological examination 


Thursday, 7:00 p.m. 


August 25 




Mathematics examination 


Thursday, 8:15 p.m. 


August 25 


ECP 


Registration for current and former 


Monday-Saturday, 


August 22- 




students 


12 Noon 


September 2 


C 


Coop Group A Registration 


Monday 


August 29 


c 


Coop Group A Tuition due 


Monday 


August 29 



c 

ECP 
ALL 
ALL 



C 

C 

DEP 

DEP 

DEP 

ECP 

ECP 
ECP 
ECP 

C 
C 

c 

ALL 
DEP 



Coop Group A Day classes begin 
Summer Session Final examinations end 
Labor Day (holiday) 
Placement Examinations 

English examinations 

Psychological examination 

Mathematics examination 
Coop Group B Registration 
Coop Group B Tuition due 
Orientation and Registration— Freshmen 
Registration— Upper Classmen 
Classes begin 
Fall Semester Registration for new 

students 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 
Last date for admission of former 

students and transfers 
Coop Group A Classes end 
Coop Group A Work period begins 
Coop Group B Classes begin 
Thanksgiving (holiday) 
Christmas recess 



ECP Christmas recess 

C Coop Group B Christmas recess 



DEP Classes resume 
ECP Classes resume 
ECP Registration for current and former 

students 
ALL Placement Examinations: 

English examinations 

Psychological examination 

Mathematics examination 
DEP Final examinations 
DEP Winter recess 
ECP Final examinations 
C Coop Group B Classes end 
C Coop Group A Work period ends 
C Coop Group B Work period begins 
C Coop Group A Tuition due 
C Coop Group A Classes begin 
ECP Registration for new students 
ECP Tuition due on or before 
C Coop Group B Tuition due on or before 
ECP Recess 
DEP Classes begin 
DEP Tuition due 
ECP Classes begin 
ECP Last date for admission of former 

students and transfers 
ALL Washington's Birthday (holiday) 
DEP Spring recess 

C Coop Group A Classes end 

C Coop Group B Work period ends 

ALL Good Friday (holiday) 

C Coop Group A Work period begins 

C Coop Group B Classes begin 

ECP Final examinations 

DEP Final examinations 



Monday 


August 29 


Wednesday 


September 2 


Monday 


September 5 


Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 


September 7 


Thursday, 7.00 p.m. 


September 8 


Thursday, 8:15 p.m. 


September 8 


Saturday 


September 10 


Saturday 


September 10 


Monday 


September 12 


Tuesday 


September 13 


Wednesday 


September 14 


Tuesday-Thursday 


September 13-15 


Thursday 


September 15 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


September 19 


Friday 


October 7 


Friday 


November 4 


Monday 


November 7 


Monday 


November 7 


Thursday, Friday 


November 24-25 


Saturday-Monday 


December 17- 




January 2 


Saturday-Monday 


December 24- 




January 2 


Saturday-Monday 


December 24- 




January 2 




1961 


Tuesday 


January 3 


Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 


January 3 


Tuesday-Saturday, 




12 Noon 


January 3-14 


Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 


anuary 10 


Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 


_ anuary 11 


Wednesday, 8:15 p.m. 


anuary 11 


Monday-Friday 


anuary 16-20 


Saturday-Sunday 


anuary 21-29 


Monday-Friday 


anuary 16-20 


Friday 


anuary 20 


Friday 


January 20 


Monday 


January 23 


Monday 


January 23 


Monday 


anuary 23 


Monday-Wednesday 


anuary 23-25 


Wednesday 


anuary 25 


Wednesday 


anuary 25 


Saturday-Tuesday 


anuary 21-31 


Monday 


anuary 30 


Monday 


_ anuary 30 


Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 


February 1 


Tuesday 


February 21 


Wednesday 


February 22 


Saturday-Sunday 


March 26- 




April 3 


Thursday 


March 30 


Thursday 


March 30 


Friday 


March 31 


Monday 


April 3 


Monday 


April 3 


Monday-Friday 


May 22-26 


Tuesday-Monday 


May 23-29 



ALL 


Placement Examinations: 








English examinations 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


une 5 




Psychological examination 


Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 


une 6 




Mathematics examination 


Tuesday, 8:15 p.m. 


June 6 


C 


Coop Group A Work period ends 


Friday 


une 9 


C 


Coop Group B Classes end 


Friday 


une 9 


ALL 


Commencement 


Sunday 


une 11 


ECP 


Summer Session Registration period 


Tuesday, Wednesday 


' une 13-14 


ECP 


Summer Session Tuition due on or 








before 


Wednesday 


June 14 


ECP 


Summer Session Classes begin 


Monday, 7:00 p.m. 


June 19 


ECP 


Independence Day (holiday) 


Tuesday 


July 4 


ECP 


Summer Session First Term final 








examinations 


Monday 


July 24 


ECP 


Summer Session Second Term classes 








begin 


Wednesday 


July 26 


ECP 


Summer Session Second Term final 








examinations 


Wednesday 


August 30 



Board of Trustees 



Richard W. Davidson, President 
Roland M. Bixler, Vice President 
A. Bryan Clark, Vice President 
Walter C. Wardner, Vice President 

William C. Bell 
Harold L. Blakeslee 
Anton Bosch 
George E. Brickwood 
C. Kenneth Catlin 
G. Gordon Copeland 
Joseph B. Dowling 
Myrlon a. Farnham 
Albert W. Gray 
Richard W. Griswold 



John F. Adams, Secretary 
Charles O. Evarts, Treasurer 
Allen Hubbard, Assistant Treasurer 



Reuben A. Holden Elmer G. Schlegel 

John T. Kimberly James H. Shattuck 

J. Payne King Austin F. Stephan 

Robert W. Leavenworth John R. Thim 



Edgar R. Lyle 
James L. Mitchell 
Henry T. Moorhead 
John O. Nelson 
Harold R. Reinhart 
Lewis Sagal 



James M. Totman 
Addison H. Verrill 
Harold E. Whitcher 
Hans G. Wiedenmann 



Board of Governors 

Roland M. Bixler, Chairman Stuart W. Finlay, V ice-Chairman 

President, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. Laird, Bissell and Meeds 

Marvin K. Peterson, Secretary 
President of the College 

William G. Cleaver Ellis C. Maxcy 

Formerly, Senior Vice President, Administrative Vice-President, The 

The First New Haven Bank and Trust Southern New England Telephone 

Company Company 

Robert 1. Metcalf 
Richard W. Davidson Director of Administration, Olin Ma- 
President and Treasurer thieson Chemical Corporation 
Thermo-Fax Sales of Conn., Inc. Bruce F Powrie 

Ti^uivT IVT rkTTHTTM/- ludustrlal Management Club Repre- 

John N. Deming sentative; Plan? Engineer, Connecti- 

Alumni Representative ^ Coke Comnanv 

^rS7s ^"P"'^^'"'"' ^^'^''^' ^"^ BuLKELEY Smith 

The Southern New England Telephone Formerly Executive Vice-President, 

Company American Tube Bending Company; 

formerly President, Manufacturers 

William C. DeVane Division, New Haven Chamber of 

Dean, Yale College; Sanford Professor Commerce 

of English PoRTER H. TuRNER 

^ ^ General Secretary, New Haven Young 

JOHN Dickie Men's Christian Association 

President, Unholtz-Dickie Corporation FREDERICK T WiLSON Tr. 

Frederick F. Fischer Vice-President, Apex Tool & Cutter 

Faculty Representative; Certified Pub- Company, Inc. 

lie Accountant; Secretary, Connecti- Dana YouNG 

cut Society of Certified Public Ac- Dean, School of Engineering, Yale Uni- 

countants versity 

Staff 

Administrative: 

Marvin K. Peterson, B.S. in Econ., M. Ed President 

Allen C. Hutchinson, A.B., M.A., Ph. D Dean 

Joseph J. Arnold, B.A Director, Reading Center 

J. Richard Banks Director of Public Relations 

Stephen J. Bennett, B.S., M.A. .. Chairman, Department of General Studies 



W. Robert Dresser, S.B., M. Eng Chairman, Department of Engineering 

Olga C. Griffeth, A.B Secretary to the College 

Paul S. Hirschberg, B.A., M.A Assistant Chairman, 

Department of Business Administration 

Lawrence C. Parker, A.B., M.A Director of Industrial Coordination 

Virginia M. Parker, A.B Director of the Division of Special Studies 

Elizabeth H. Patton, B.S Librarian 

Katherine Blenis Ramshaw, A.B., B.S Registrar and Alumni Secretary 

CusHMAN L. Robertson, B.S., M.A Director of Student Services 

Irwin Siegel, B.A., M.A., M.S. 

Chairman, Department of Business Administration 
Philip B. Watson, S.B. .. Chairman, Department of Industrial Engineering 
Office: 

Shirley Breitenstein Secretary 

Margaret P. Buck Receptionist 

Mary K. Burdick Recorder 

Vera Conroy Secretary 

Virginia C. DeLise Secretary 

Marion I. DePalma Secretary 

Phylis Ann Hasselbach Secretary 

Alice C. Holloran Secretary 

Alice A. Mujaes Secretary 

Helen G. Patry Veteran Affairs Coordinator 

Louise H. Scott Receptionist-Secretary 

Ann M. Seaman Secretary 

Thomas A. Vogler, B.A Assistant Librarian 

Arthur Welwood, B.A Assistant Librarian 

Mary C. Williams, B.A Bursar 

Maintenance: 

Frank P. Cavallaro Custodian 

Standing Committees of the Staff 
Academic Council: Mr. Hutchinson, chairman; Mr. Bennett, Mr. Dres- 
ser, Mr. Hirschberg, Mrs. Patton, Mr. Siegel, Mr. Watson. 
Academic Standing and Admissions: Mr. Hutchinson, chairman; Mrs. 

Ramshaw, Mr. Robertson. 
Administrative: Mr. Peterson, chairman; Mr. Hutchinson, Mr. Parker, 

Mr. Siegel. 
Library: Mrs. Patton, chairman; Mr. Bennett, Mr. Hirschberg, Mr. 

Watson. 
Scholarship: Mr. Robertson, chairman; Mr. Dresser, Mr. Hutchinson. 
Standing Committees of the Board of Governors 
and the Board of Trustees 
Building: Mr. Dickie, chairman; Mr. Cleaver, Mr. Finlay, Mr. Powrie. 
Commencement: Mr. Metcalf, chairman; Mr. DeVane, Mr. Turner. 
Development: Mr. Maxcy, chairman; Mr. Bixler, Mr. Finlay, Mr. 

Peterson. 
Executive: Mr. Bixler, chairman; Mr. Finlay, vice chairman; Mr. Fischer, 

Mr. Metcalf, Mr. Young. Ex officio: Mr. Peterson, secretary; Mr. 

Turner. 
Finance: Mr. Finlay, chairman; Mr. Turner. 
Personnel: Mr. Maxcy, chairman; Mr. Metcalf, Mr. Young. 
Public Relations: Mr. Smith, chairman; Mr. DeVane, 

8 



PURPOSES and HISTORY 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



New Haven College 



Statement of Purposes 

New Haven College is an independent, co-educational community col- 
lege. Its sole aim is to serve the educational needs of the people and institu- 
tions within the Southern Connecticut area. 

This non-profit, non-sectarian institution serves the people of this area 
by providing educational opportunities, with particular emphasis on the 
fields of engineering and business, which best accommodate their needs — 
those already employed as well as those preparing for employment. 

Basically, it offers programs for college-age students preparing them- 
selves for careers, and for already employed adults seeking to further their 
education. Its programs for college-age students are offered during the day- 
time. Its programs for employed adults are offered primarily in the evening 
in order that they can continue their education without affecting their 
earning power. 

New Haven College serves the industries of the Southern Connecticut 
area by providing them with a pool of educated talent from which they can 
fill their manpower needs. 

It serves the community also by providing a supply of educated, 
thoughtful citizens who, because of their education, are equipped to fulfill 
their obligations to their home municipalities, their state and nation. 



History 

When New Haven College was established in 1920 as a branch of North- 
eastern University, the concept of a two-year terminal college education still 
was radically new. In the intervening decades, however, the concept of a 
two-year college program for people unable for financial or other reasons to 
leave home or to embark on a four-year college course and yet anxious to 
continue their education beyond the high school level has found nation-wide 
acceptance. New Haven College is a pioneer in the community college 
program. 

By act of the Connecticut General Assembly, the state legislature, New 
Haven College was incorporated in 1926 as an independent college. Simul- 
taneously, it negotiated an agreement with Yale under which the latter pro- 
vided the young college with use of University classroom and laboratory 
facilities as a contribution to the work of this new community institution. 

Another significant landmark in this 40-year-old history occurred in 
1930 when New Haven College, which until then had offered simply a 
scattering of relatively unrelated courses, embarked upon its program of 
planned education for employed adults. This movement, which embodied a 
principle still of significant importance to the institution and to the com- 

10 



Purposes and History 11 

munity, was stimulated by Ellis C. Maxcy, director of the College from 1930 
to 1937, and now a member of the Board of Governors. 

A two-year period of experimentation based on planned cooperation 
between business and industry, on the one hand, and the College, on the 
other, led to a new development in 1938. That year the companies partici- 
pating in this experimental program formalized their relationship with the 
College by appointing 300 coordinators. The function of these coordinators 
was to act as counselors and liaison officers, whichever was required by the 
occasion, for: 1) the student-employee; 2) the individual company with 
which he was associated; and 3) the College. From this movement toward 
close cooperation among business, industry and the college, the Evening 
Credit Program now being offered as part of the regular curriculum was 
evolved. Under this program, regularly employed adults may attend classes 
in the evening, and can work for a college degree without losing the wages 
they receive from their regular daytime employment. 

The Engineering, Science, and Management War Training Program was 
organized in 1941 under Federal sponsorship and financing as an aid to war 
industry. Its purpose was to develop the skilled personnel needed by in- 
dustry during the war emergency. An official program of Yale University, it 
was administered in New Haven County by the College, and had lasting 
significance for two reasons. First, it revealed new areas in which the College 
could provide training and educational services for the local industrial 
community. Secondly, it resulted in another expansion of the College cur- 
riculum. 

The first veteran of World War II enrolled in 1944. Except as a har- 
binger of the peace that was to follow, this event might have had little sig- 
nificance in the history of the College. Actually, it turned out to be a most 
significant event for New Haven College and for American higher educa- 
tion, since in the next five years enrollment soared because of returning 
veterans anxious to obtain their college degrees. Equally important, this 
growth in enrollment was not temporary. Even after the returning veterans 
had completed their education, enrollments remained high, mainly because 
the concept of higher education had gained currency among the American 
public. As it has been since 1945, the problem today is to find enough quali- 
fied teachers and adequate classroom facilities to accommodate the many 
people in the area who want a college education. 

The development of five-year Employee Training Agreements with 
companies also occurred in 1944. These agreements, providing for new and 
improved relations with business, helped the College adapt its programs to 
the post-war needs of the community. The funds received allowed the Col- 
lege to provide new and increased leadership, improved services to cooperat- 
ing companies, and new programs of study to fit the community's post-war 
needs. 

Another important event in the history of New Haven College occurred 
in 1948, when the College was accredited by the New England Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This approval granted in recognition of 
the high academic standards maintained by New Haven College means that 
credits earned by students at the College will be accepted toward degrees at 
other accredited colleges and universities. 



12 New Haven College 

The Cooperative Program of Education, under which the student alter- 
nates four months of full-time study with a similar period of full-time work, 
was inaugurated at New Haven College in 1949. This work-study plan, 
originated by the University of Cincinnati in 1906 and since then adopted 
by many other institutions of higher education, was a natural outgrowth of 
the College's long experience of cooperation with the community's business 
and industry. The subsequent response to the program is testimony to the 
College's awareness of the needs of New Haven area students. 

New Haven College undertook a unique venture in 1952, when the 
first class in its School of Executive Development was organized. The School 
of Executive Development (SED) is a four-year program for middle-level 
executives, and is designed to help them develop the additional breadth and 
understanding outside the area of their own specialization which is requisite 
for their promotion to the top levels of management. Operating under the 
guidance of a group of senior executives from New Haven business and in- 
dustry, the program further exemplifies the cooperation between the College 
and the industrial community in meeting both present and future needs. 

A program to develop engineering aides for the Olin Mathieson Chemi- 
cal Corporation was started by New Haven College in 1956. In view of the 
expected shortage of engineering personnel, this program has a significance 
that in the years to come will extend far beyond the New Haven area. This 
type of program is adaptable to the needs of any company or organization 
in the central Connecticut area. Recent examples of this are the electrical 
engineering program designed for Pratt, Read & Company and associated 
companies in the Essex, Connecticut, area, and the Police Science Program. 
Extensive in-plant programs supplement this service. 

The year 1957-58 proved to be the most significant in the history of New 
Haven College. During this year the College announced its plans for the 
new Daytime Engineering Program to be offered for the first time starting 
in September, 1958. This program, open to graduates of accredited high 
schools, is a regular four-year engineering course. Students completing the 
two-year Daytime Engineering Program can transfer to the bachelor degree 
programs of New Haven College. In addition, if thy choose, they may obtain 
employment in any of the many local industries seeking engineering talent. 
This program helps meet the national shortage of engineers and is of great 
benefit to area students wishing to embark upon an engineering education 
while living home. 

Construction was started in October, 1957, on the New Haven College 
building which houses the Daytime Engineering Program as well as other 
course offerings. This modern campus building on Cold Spring Street was 
occupied in September, 1958. Futher expansion of this building is now 
proposed. 

Finally, New Haven College received authorization in 1959 to offer 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in the fields of business, 
accounting, management, and industrial engineering. This authorization, 
granted only after a rigid inspection of its educational facilities, certified the 
growing recognition of New Haven College as one of Connecticut's leading 



Purposes and History 13 

educational institutions. It also signified the ability of the College to grow 
with the mounting educational needs of the community. 

The ultimate objective of New Haven College, as formulated through- 
out its history, is to help its students realize their vocational aims, and also 
to help them, through a program of general education and guidance, to 
achieve an increased understanding and appreciation of life. By so doing, it 
provides the community with the type of citizens required in a healthy 
democracy. 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 



General Information 



New Haven College, I96O-I96I 



New Haven College 



Divisions of the College 

New Haven College has seven divisions, each of which serves a special 
function. They are: The Evening Credit Program, The Daytime Coopera- 
tive Program, The Daytime Engineering Program, The College-Community 
Program, The Division of Special Studies, The School of Executive Develop- 
ment, and The Reading Center. 

Detailed information about each of these divisions is available on the 
subsequent pages of this catalog. For purposes of ready identification, a brief 
description of each follows. 

The Credit Programs 

The Evening Credit Program is the evening degree-granting division of 
the College and consists of the Upper Division which confers the bachelor 
degree, and the Junior College which offers the associate degree programs. 

The Daytime Cooperative Program, intended for recent high school 
graduates, alternates periods of full-time studies with periods of employment 
in business and industry. Students taking this program may earn the Associ- 
ate in Science degree. 

The Daytime Engineering Program is a co-educational program offer- 
ing a four-year engineering program. It provides an opportunity for those 
students interested in engineering, mathematics or science to pursue their 
college program while residing at home. Students completing the first two 
years receive the Associate in Science Degree in Engineering. Those com- 
pleting the third and fourth years receive the Bachelor of Science in Indus- 
trial Engineering. A student may elect the general Industrial Engineering 
program or the Electrical, Mechanical, or Metallurgical option. 

The College-Community Programs are programs under which qualified 
employees of a company or other organizations undertake a three-year 
course in the field of engineering or science. Late afternoon classes are 
combined with in-plant training. These programs supplement the knowl- 
edge and skills of selected employees of the participating organizations with 
formal classroom instruction. By so doing, the industries and organizations 
of this area are training their own technical and managerial reserves. 

The Division of Special Studies 

This Division offers a series of special courses in the fields of engineer- 
ing, business and general areas. Usually students taking these courses do not 
receive academic credits. The courses generally are designed to provide 
supplemental knowledge and skills needed in specialized jobs in business and 
industry. Further information about this Division may be obtained through 
the index of this catalog or by requesting separate bulletins from the Col- 
lege. 

16 



General Information 17 

The School of Executive Development 

This four-year program for middle-level executives consists of advanced 
studies in the field of management, with emphasis placed on the develop- 
ment of the student's breadth and understanding outside the area of his or 
her specialization. The School is guided by a group of senior executives of 
New Haven area businesses and industries, and its enrollment is limited to 
individuals designated by their respective companies and approved by the 
College. This program is offered in the late afternoon hours. Additional in- 
formation about this program may be obtained by consulting the references 
listed in the index of this catalog or from separate bulletins which may be 
obtained from the College. 

The Reading Center 

Of great significance is the fact that a large number of elementary, 
secondary, and college students are seriously deficient in many aspects of 
reading. This deficiency is equally significant in the adult world where the 
demands of an increasingly complex society require a greater amount of 
reading. 

It is the aim of the New Haven College Reading Center to offer a 
varied program of reading techniques and study skills to fit the specific 
needs of students and adults. The program is designed for classroom group 
teaching techniques on the elementary, secondary, college and adult levels. 
The program includes small group and individual tutoring for students of 
all age and accomplishment levels. In-plant management training programs 
can be arranged. 

New Haven College and Yale University 

The relationship of New Haven College and Yale University is defined 
by the following excerpt from the Yale University Catalogue: 

"No extension or evening classes are offered by Yale University either 
in termtime or during the summer. 

"Individuals interested in late afternoon or evening work are referred 
to New Haven College, an independent community institution chartered by 
the Connecticut legislature, which is operated in ten buildings contributed 
by Yale without charge as part of its service to the Community." 

Admission 

Since each division of the College has its own admission requirements, 
these requirements are defined in detail in subsequent pages of this catalog. 

In general, graduates of accredited secondary high schools are eligible 
for admission. However, in special cases persons who have not completed 
their high school education may be admitted to the various divisions of New 
Haven College by meeting certain specified conditions. 

In the case of adults, the College is interested in evidence of maturity 
as well as in formal education as prerequisites for admission. 



18 New Haven College 

Accreditations and Memberships 

New Haven College is a co-educational, non-sectarian, independent in- 
stitution of higher learning chartered by the Legislature of the State of 
Connecticut, accredited by the Connecticut State Department of Education 
as a junior and senior college. The College holds membership in the Ameri- 
can Association of Junior Colleges, the Association of YMCA Schools and 
Colleges, The Connecticut Conference of Junior Colleges, the New England 
Junior College Council, the American Council on Education and the Con- 
necticut Council on Higher Education. The junior college division is a 
member of the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Transferability of Credit 

In accordance with the usual practice among institutions of higher 
learning, transfer of credit from this College to another institution will be 
determined by the other institution in terms of the achievement and promise 
of the individual seeking transfer. The institution to which transfer is being 
made will also evaluate specific courses in terms of their length and content 
in relation to its specific requirements. New Haven College is an accredited 
institution and its credits will be given consideration by the major institu- 
tions of the country in terms of the conditions outlined above. 

Student Personnel Services 

In the interest of assisting each student to achieve his fullest develop- 
ment as a personality and of helping him to utilize most effectively the 
instruction offered, the College makes available to all students a variety of 
services which are his for the asking. 
These services include: 

Counseling and Guidance 

Testing 

Job Placement 

Loans and Scholarships 

Student Activities 

Counseling and Guidance — Members of the administrative staff of the 
College reserve many hours for counseling with students. Students need only 
to request an appointment in order to seek information and help. By in- 
quiring at the office, a student may learn who is most qualified to discuss 
his problem with him. Counseling and guidance is offered in such areas as 
program planning; study habits and methods; personal, marital or domestic 
problems; vocational selection and choice; job adjustment; relationship with 
Veterans Administration, the military establishments and Selective Service; 
and others. 

Testing — Counselors, upon request, will report and interpret to students 
the results of their entrance tests. 

The Director of Student Services, as a professional vocational counselor, 
is prepared to undertake vocational testing and counseling with students 
requesting this service. 



General Information 



19 



Tuition Loan Fund — Gifts to the College have made possible a revolving 
loan fund which is administered in accordance with the policies established 
by the Board of Governors. 

The purpose of this fund is to assist students to meet tuition costs by 
means of a loan of not more than fifty percent of their tuition for any one 
semester. No interest charge is made for this loan. Applications for assistance 
should be made to the College. 

In addition, loan funds are available to full-time students under the 
provisions of Title II, The National Defense Education Act of 1958. 

Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid — A limited number of scholarships and 
grants-in-aid, amounting to approximately one-half of the tuition, are avail- 
able each year. These are awarded by the Scholarship Committee on the 
basis of scholastic record, ability to profit from the program and financial 
need. To be eligible for a scholarship, a student is expected to have a 
Quality Point Ratio of 3.0 for work taken at this College. Scholastic require- 
ments to qualify for a grant-in-aid are a Quality Point Ratio of 2.0. Ap- 
plication forms may be secured from the College office. 

The Industrial Management Club of New Haven makes available 
scholarships to students attending New Haven College. These scholarships 
are administered by the Education Committee of the Industrial Manage- 
ment Club under the policies established by the Club. 

The Alumni Association makes scholarship grants to undergraduates as 
well as to outstanding members of each graduating class. 

The New Haven Chapter of the American Society of Tool Engineers 
provides an annual scholarship to a student in mechanical engineering. 

All scholarships are administered by the Scholarship Committee of the 
College. Applications may be obtained at the College office. 

Student Council — A student council is elected annually by the student 
body. The Council bears the responsibility for initiating, organizing and 
carrying through extra-curricular activities and of performing liaison func- 
tions between students and the College staff. The major work of the Council 
is performed through its Student-Faculty Relations Committee and Social 
Committee. 

The Engineering Society — The Engineering Society of the College is 
chartered as a student chapter of the American Association of Engineers 
which has as its aims "to promote the social and economic welfare of engi- 
neers, to stimulate public service in the profession, to encourage and 
develop the efficiency of the engineer, and to promote unity in the profes- 
sion." 

The activities of the society include lectures, discussions and field trips 
designed to stimulate interest in the field of engineering and to supplement 
formal study. 

Full membership is open to undergraduates who have completed second- 
year engineering mathematics, and to engineering graduates. Students who 
are fully matriculated as freshmen in engineering may hold associate mem- 
bership. 



20 New Haven College 

Athletic Activities — Intramural competition is organized and is sponsored 
by the College in basketball, bowling, golf, and tennis. 

Intercollegiate athletics are carried out in soccer, basketball, golf and 
tennis under the tutelage of professional coaches. 

Y.M.C.A. Privileges — Each male student enrolled in the credit programs 
of the College is granted free use of the facilities of the New Haven 
Y.M.C.A. during his period of enrollment. He may participate in group 
sports conducted there under the supervision of a member of the College 
staff, or he may individually use the privileges at times convenient to him. 

Each student who wishes to use the Y.M.C.A. must obtain an identifica- 
tion card at the College office each semester and present it at the Y.M.C.A. 
After satisfying the physical examination requirements he may continue to 
take advantage of his privileges during each period of enrollment in the 
College. 

Student Newspaper — The News is the all-college newspaper edited and 
published by the student group. Any student may volunteer his services on 
the newspaper staff. The Woodsman is the newspaper published by and 
for the daytime students. 

Social Activities — The Orientation Assembly at the opening of each 
semester provides an occasion for the induction of new students into the life 
of the College. Addresses by members of the College staff are followed by 
a program of entertainment. 

Guest Nights — Students and faculty invite wives, husbands or friends 
to attend classes with them at the College and entertain them informally 
following class visits. 

Dances — Three or four dances, informal and semi-formal, are held 
annually for the entire student body. 

Other Social Activities include those sponsored by the various student 
organizations among which are the senior banquet; meetings of the Stu- 
dent Council with the Board of Governors and the Academic Committee; 
the professional societies; the social activities of the daytime programs; and 
the Alumni reception for members of the graduating class following com- 
mencement. 

Veterans 

New Haven College is approved (by the State Board of Education) for 
the education of veterans under the provisions of Title 38, United States 
Code, Veterans' Benefits; Public Law 85-857. 

In view of the fact that the full evening program of the College is 
approximately a half-time program, veterans attending evening classes have 
approximately twice the time for education for which they are eligible in 
a full-time program. Those enrolled in a full-time program naturally will 
be using their eligibility at the full rate. 

Change of Program — Veterans Administration regulations do not permit 
the College to authorize a change of program for a veteran. Changes must 
be authorized by the Veterans Administration. 



General Information 21 

Counseling — Although the Veteran Affairs Coordinator is the official des- 
ignated to handle veterans' problems, other members of the administrative 
staff are available and prepared to discuss problms with veterans. Appoint- 
ments may be made at the office of the College. 

Library 

The main library, centrally located in two well-equipped rooms at 51 
Prospect Street, contains approximately 6000 volumes in an open shelf ar- 
rangement, with facilities for study and browsing. This collection, while 
strongest in the specific major areas of study in the college curriculum, covers 
all fields. An intensive program of broadening and strengthening the library 
is in progress. 

Subscriptions to more than one hundred periodicals are main- 
tained, including many technical journals which correlate with the curricu- 
lum. 

A branch library at 100 Cold Spring Street serves the students having 
courses at College Woods. Two rooms on the main floor contain a rapidly 
growing collection of books, periodicals and pamphlets, and are equipped 
for use as study and reading rooms. 

The full resources of the New Haven Public Library (315,000 volumes) 
are available to all New Haven College students, regardless of place of resi- 
dence. 

Alumni Association 

Eligibility for membership in the Alumni Association is acquired im- 
mediately upon graduation from either the associate or bachelor programs. 
One of the staff officers of the College serves as Alumni Secretary. An Execu- 
tive Committee conducts the affairs of the association during the periods 
between annual meetings and also serves as a planning group. There is a 
standing committee on annual giving. 

In addition to the annual meeting, other meetings of social and edu- 
cational interest occur during the year. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Governors by 
the election of a member to the Board for a term of two years. The president 
of the Association serves on the Board of Governors as an ex-officio member. 

The Association awards scholarships to qualified students and prizes 
to outstanding members of the graduating class. 

Scholastic Regulations 

Grading System — The following grading system is in use, and except 
where otherwise specified, applies both to examinations and to term work. 
The weight of a final examination grade is a matter individually determined 
by each instructor. 

A Superior 

B Good 

C Fair 

D Lowest passing grade 

F Failure 



22 New Haven College 

Inc. Incomplete. Indicates that some work remains to be completed. 
Such work must be made up promptly in order to remove the 
"incomplete." Otherwise, the "Inc." remains on the student's 
record, no credit is given for the course and it must be repeated 
before further work for which it is prerequisite may be taken. 

WD Withdrawal. Indicates either: (1) Withdrawal prior to midpoint 
of semester, or (2) withdrawal after midpoint of semester and 
work satisfactory at that time. 

WF Indicates withdrawal after midpoint of semester with unsatis- 
factory work. 

S Satisfactory. Given only in non-credit required Daytime Engineer- 
ing and Coop courses. 

U Unsatisfactory. Given only in non-credit required Daytime Engi- 
neering and Coop courses. 

Grade Reports — Reports of the final grade in each subject will be mailed 
to the student soon after the close of each semester. The same report will 
be mailed to employers in those instances where the student has given his 
approval. 

Placement on Academic Probation — The academic standing of each stu- 
dent will be determined on the basis of his quality point ratio each semester. 

The quality point ratios required to be in good academic standing are 
as follows: 

During the first and second semester of enrollment in the 
College, a quality point ratio of 1.5 is required. 

After the student is enrolled in the third semester, a quality 
point ratio of 1.6 is required. 

Failure to earn the required quality point ratio in any semester will 
place a student on academic probation for the following semester of en- 
rollment. 

Attention is called to the fact that the minimum quality point ratio of 
1.6 which is required to remain in good academic standing from semester 
to semester is insufficient to meet the graduation requirement of a total 
quality point ratio of 2.0. Therefore, the fact that a student may never have 
been on probation is no guarantee that he will meet graduation require- 
ments. 

In order to determine quality point ratios, each letter grade is assigned 
a quality point value: 

A 4 quality points 

B 3 quality points 

C 2 quality points 

D 1 quality point 

F quality points 

WF quality points 



General Information 23 

The quality point ratio for all credit students is obtained by multiply- 
ing the quality point value of each grade by the number of semester hours 
of the course, then dividing the total quality points by the total semester 
hours. 

Removal of Probation or Dismissal for Academic Deficiency — 

1. A student who has been placed on probation and who does not 
earn the required quality point ratio in the next semester will be dismissed 
from the division of the College in which he is enrolled. 

2. A student who has twice been on probation will be dismissed from 
the division of the College in which he is enrolled the next time his quality 
point ratio for any semester falls below the required minimum. 

3. A student whose quality point ratio in any one semester is less than 
1.0 will be dismissed from the College. 

Readmission — Applications for readmission to this College after a student 
has been dismissed, and application for admission to this College following 
dismissal from another college, will be considered only after the lapse of 
a semester and only when the student provides evidence which indicates his 
probable success if readmitted. 

Requests for readmission should be submitted in writing to the Dean 
at least three weeks before the opening of the semester and should include 
evidence supporting the student's belief that he may succeed if readmitted. 

Readmission does not automatically follow; each application is decided 
individually by the Committee on Academic Standing. 

Dean's List — Full-time students who earn a quality point ratio of 3.2, or 
better, in any one semester will be placed on the Dean's List. 

All part-time students who have accumulated a minimum of 14 semes- 
ter hours at the College will automatically be considered for the Dean's 
List at the end of each semester. An accumulative Quality Point Ratio of 
3.2 or better is required. 



Attendance Regulations 

Evening Credit Program — A student is automatically dropped when his 
absences exceed three per semester for a 3-semester-hour course, with ab- 
sences proportionally increased for courses carrying additional semester 
hours. 

Daytime Credit Programs — Classes are operated on the policy that it is 
necessary for all students to attend all class meetings. If a class is missed, the 
benefits from participation in the class discussion and instruction are com- 
pletely lost. No student, regardless of ability, can afford that loss. "Free cuts" 
do not exist at New Haven College. 

In the event of illness or emergency the student must notify his in- 
structor. Excessive absences will be reported to the Dean for dismissal action. 



24 New Haven College 

Requirements for the Degree 

The Associate and Bachelor degrees will be conferred at Commence- 
ment when the student has met all the requirments of his program and: 

1. Has earned a cumulative quality point ratio of at least 2.0; 

2. Has been recommended by the faculty; 

3. Has met all financial obligations. 

Degree With Honors — ■ 

A degree with honors is awarded to students who have a quality point 
ratio of 3.33 for the semester hours specifically required for the degree pro- 
gram from which they are being graduated, and who have taken all the 
required work at this College. 

Transfer students will be awarded honors on the same basis, provided 
however, that their total average will be considered only when they have an 
honor average for studies completed at this College. 

Degree With High Honors — 

A degree with high honors is awarded to students who have a quality 
point ratio of 3.6 based on the same considerations as noted above. 

In determining eligibility for degrees with honors, credits earned by 
crediting examinations and electives in excess of those required will not be 
considered. 

Transfer Students — 

Students who have been granted advanced standing for credits earned 
at another college are required to earn at New Haven College a minimum 
of eighteen semester hours for the Associate in Science degree, and a mini- 
mum of thirty semester hours for the Bachelor of Science degree. 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 



Evening Credit Programs 



OFFERING THE DEGREE 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 

in 

General Studies 

Business Administration 

Accounting 

Management 

Industrial Management 

General Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Metallurgical Engineering 

OFFERING THE DEGREE 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

in 

Business Administration 

Accounting 

Industrial Management 

Industrial Engineering 
—General Option 
—Electrical Option 
—Mechanical Option 
—Metallurgical Option 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



Calendar 
The Evening Credit Programs 

Spring Semester 1960 



Registration for current and former students 

Placement Examinations: 

English examinations 

Psychological examination 

Mathematics examination 
Registration for new students 

Tuition due on or before 

Classes begin 

Last date for admission of former students 

and transfers 
Washington's Birthday (holiday) 
Good Friday (holiday) 
Final examinations 
Commencement 



Monday-Saturday, 
12 Noon 

Monday, 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 8:15 p.m. 
Wednesday-Saturday 

12 Noon 
Saturday, 12 Noon 
Monday, 7:00 p.m. 
Friday 



Placement Examinations: 
English examinations 
Psychological examination 
Mathematics examination 
Registration period 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 

Independence Day (holiday) 
First Term final examinations 
Second Term classes begin 
Second Term final examinations 



Monday 
Friday 

Tuesday-Tuesday 
Sunday 

Summer Session 1960 

Monday, 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 8:15 p.m. 
Tuesday, Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Monday, 7:00 p.m. 
Monday 
Monday 
Wednesday 



Monday 

Fall Semester 1960 

Registration for current and former students Moifflay-Friday 

Placement Examinations: 

English examinations 

Psychological examination 

Mathematics examination 
Labor Day (holiday) 
Placement Examinations: 

English examinations 

Psychological examination 

Mathematics examination 
Registration for new students 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 
Last date for admission of former students 

and transfers 
Thanksgiving (holiday) 
Christmas recess 



Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 
Thursday, 7:00 p.m. 
Thursday, 8:15 p.m. 
Monday 

Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 
Thursday, 7:00 p.m. 
Thursday, 8:15 p.m. 
Tuesday-Thursday 
Thursday 
Monday, 7:00 p.m. 

Friday 

Thursday, Friday 
Saturday-Monday 



Classes resume 
Final examinations 
Recess 



Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday-Tuesday 

Spring Semester 1961 

Registration for current and former students Tuesday-Saturday, 

„, ^ 12 Noon 

Placement Examinations: 

English examinations Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 

Psychological examination Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 

Mathematics examination Wednesday, 8:15 p.m. 

Registration for new students Monday- Wednesday 



January 4-16 



January 11 
January 12 
January 12 
January 20-23 

January 23 
February 1 
February 19 

February 22 
April 15 
May 17-24 
June 12 



June 6 
June 7 
June 7 
June 14, 15 
June 15 
June 20 
July 4 

July 25 / 
July 27 
August 29 

August 22- 
September 2 

August 23 
August 25 
August 25 
September 5 

September 7 
September 8 
September 8 
September 13-15 
September 15 
September 19 
October 7 

November 24-25 
December 24- 

January 2 
January 3 
January 16-20 
January 21-31 

January 3-14 



January 10 
January 11 
January 11 
January 23-25 



26 



Evening Credit Program 



27 



Tuition due on or before 

Classes begin 

Last date for admission of former students 

and transfers 
Washington's Birthday (holiday) 
Good Friday (holiday) 
Final examinations 
Commencement 



Wednesday 
Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Friday 

Monday-Friday 

Sunday 



Summer Session 1961 



Placement Examinations: 
English examinations 
Psychological examination 
Mathematics examination 
Registration period 
Tuition due on or before 
Classes begin 

First Term final examinations 
Second Term classes begin 
Second Term final examinations 



Monday, 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, 8:15 p.m. 
Tuesday, Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Monday, 7:00 p.m. 
Monday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 



January 25 
February 1 

February 21 
February 22 
March 31 
May 22-26 
June 11 



June 5 
June 6 
June 6 
June 13,14 
June 14 
June 19 
July 24 
July 26 
August 30 



Evening Credit Program 

Staff Member in Charge: Allen C. Hutchinson 



Aims and Objectives 

Recognizing that education, in the broadest sense of the word, is a 
process confined not alone to the classroom, this program of instruction pro- 
vided by the College takes notice of a student's job as well as his instruc- 
tional experiences. 

The College believes that work is good educational experience, but that 
when work experience is related to academic instruction it is better. There- 
fore, it contends that a student's work experiences and academic experiences 
should be integrated as much as is possible and feasible. It sees this integra- 
tion as a means whereby the traditional barrier between the academic and 
the practical may be broken down. 

In accordance with this point of view, the College encourages and assists 
its students either to seek employment which is related to their programs of 
study, or to pursue programs of study which are related to their present or 
contemplated work. This the College does because it regards the student's 
job as a laboratory where he may apply the knowledge he gains at the 
College, or from which he receives practical incentives for study in the 
classroom. As is to be expected, the degree of relationship between work 
and study will vary among companies depending on the variety of experi- 
ence possible in a given company and the degree of cooperation developed 
between the College and the company in planning for these relationships. 

It is important that students pursue a related work program after the 
first year of study. It has been found that, although not essential to the more 
elementary work of the first year, work experience is essential thereafter if 
the student is to progress with the general level of his classes. Dependence 



28 New Haven College 

is placed on work experience for acquiring technical terminology, skill, and 
familiarity with illustrations which will be used in classes. While the degree 
of essential relationship between work and study may be slight even in the 
second year, the need progressively increases in the advanced stages of the 
program. The most elementary office jobs for a business student, or com- 
parable plant jobs for an engineering student, are considered sufficiently 
related for the earlier part of the program. 

The placement activity of the College, described elsewhere in this bul- 
letin, is designed primarily to implement the idea of an integrated program 
of related work and study. 

Admission of Students 

With the exception of "auditors", students wishing to take any course 
in the Evening Credit Program, whether or not they seek a degree, must 
satisfy the admission requirements. 



Admission of Students from Secondary Schools 

Requirements — The following regulations apply to the admission of stu- 
dents from secondary schools. 

The applicant should be a graduate of an approved secondary school 
or should possess a state high school diploma.* In some cases, an adult who 
has completed at least two years of secondary school with satisfactory record 
may be considered, provided he performs exceptionally well on the place- 
ment examinations which are required. The admission of such an adult 
will be tentative for one year, during which time he must pass the state 
examinations for the state high school diploma.* No person will be con- 
sidered who has not completed at least two years of secondary school. The 
quality of the secondary school record, especially of the academic subjects 
it contains, is given greater consideration than is the specific pattern of 
courses taken in secondary school. 

Applicants from secondary schools are required to take certain place- 
ment examinations as follows: 

The Psychological Examination, which is a measure of scholastic 
ability, is required of all. In conjunction with the secondary school 
record it determines the acceptability of the student. 

The Mechanics of English Examination, which is a test of English 
usage, spelling, punctuation and capitalization, is required of all. 
Applicants otherwise admitted who do not perform satisfactorily 
on this test will be required to enroll in E A, Basic Grammar, 
before enrolling in E 113, English Composition. 

The Reading Comprehension Examination, which is a test of read- 
ing speed and comprehension, is required of all. Since reading 
deficiency is a serious handicap, applicants otherwise admitted who 

• Information regarding the examinations for the state high school diploma may be 
obtained from the Director of Student Services, or by writing to the Bureau of Youth 
Services, State Department of Education, State Office Building, Hartford, Connecticut. 



Evening Credit Program 29 

do not perform satisfactorily on this test will be required to sched- 
ule E B Reading Laboratory early in their program. 
The Mathematics Examination, which covers plane geometry and 
two years of high school algebra, is required of all engineering or 
mathematics students who wish to begin their mathematics study 
at any level above M A-B, Basic Mathematics I. Performance in this 
examination will determine whether the applicant, otherwise ad- 
mitted, will be placed in M A-B, in M C-D, in M 113, or in M 114. 
Electing not to take the examination automatically places the stu- 
dent in M A-B, Basic Math I. 

Admission of Students Transferring from Other Colleges 

Requirements — Transfer students who present evidence of completion of 
at least thirty semester hours of study at an accredited college with an over- 
all average of "C" or better may be admitted on the basis of an official 
transcript and will not be required to take the Psychological Examination. 
For the purpose of determining placement, the following examinations 
are required as indicated below: 

The Mechanics of English Examination and the Reading Comprehen- 
sion Examination are required unless the transcript shows the completion 
of at least three semester hours of college English with a grade of "C" or 
better. 

The Mathematics Examination is required if the student wishes to un- 
dertake engineering or mathematics, unless his transcript shows the comple- 
tion of at least three semester hours of college mathematics with "C" or 
better grades. 

Placement in courses as a result of the above examinations will be on 
the same basis as for applicants from secondary schools. 

Transfer students who do not have the required thirty semester hours 
of work as noted above, or who have been dismissed for academic deficiency, 
are required to take the Psychological Examination in addition to the other 
placement examinations which are applicable, as described above. 

Transfer students who are not certain of the quality of their previous 
work are advised to take all entrance examinations lest their transcript be 
delayed and of an unacceptable quality. 

Advanced Standing — Credit for work applicable to the program under- 
taken at New Haven College will be granted tentatively upon receipt of 
official transcript from the previous college, and the student will be notified 
of the credit granted. It will be officially granted only upon the successful 
completion of a year's work at New Haven College. 

Transfer students who wish to fulfill the requirements of the A.S. de- 
gree at New Haven College must complete a minimum of eighteen semester 
hours at this College, twelve of which must be in their field of specialization. 

Transfer students for the B.S. degree must complete a minimum of 
thirty semester hours at this College. 



30 New Haven College 

Crediting Examinations 

The Crediting Examination provides means whereby credit may be 
estabhshed lor a course by examination. It is the policy of the College that 
no student shall be required to take courses which he does not need because 
oi' previous experience or education. Since his previous experience or edu- 
cation may have been with a non-accredited institution or agency, or with 
the armed forces, it is difficult to determine the amount of credit which he 
should receive toward a New Haven College degree. Therefore, a student 
may meet course prerequisites and/or establish credit in specific courses by 
passing successfully a Crediting Examination in each of the courses in which 
he feels qualified. 

Students desiring to undertake a Crediting Examination should first 
discuss the matter with the Dean. If it is agreed that the examination is 
feasible, an application accompanied by a fee of fifteen dollars should be 
submitted. The examination is then arranged. 

A Crediting Examination normally will consist of a three- to four-hour 
written and a one-hour oral examination. 

At least one year's successful study must be completed at the College 
before credit awarded by examination will be granted officially. 

Application and Admission Procedures 

Those interested in seeking admission should phone or write the Col- 
lege and arrange for a personal interview with a staff member. At the time 
of the interview the applicant will complete a Personal Data Form, pay 
the application fee, and plan his program. Interviews may be scheduled dur- 
ing office hours at the convenience of the applicant. 

During the registration period and after the conclusion of the inter- 
view, the student who has decided to seek admission completes registration 
forms indicating the courses he wants, and, depending upon the date of j 
registration, also pays the tuition charges. Only the tuition is refundable 
and then only in the event that the College does not accept the applicant. 

Following application, the College requests the secondary school record 
of the applicant. Applicants who wish to present college transcripts, either 
for admission purposes or for advanced standing, must themselves request 
their college transcript to be sent to the College. The College provides a 
form on which the applicant may make this request. 

The applicant next takes such placement examinations as are required 
of him and is notified in writing of his acceptance or rejection, and of the 
subjects he will be required to take as a result of his performance on the 
placement examinations. 

Class admission cards and book lists will be mailed to the registrant 
immediately preceding the opening of classes. 

Classification of Students 

There are three classifications of students in the Evening Credit Pro- 
gram: Degree Student, Non-Degree Student, and Auditor. 



Evening Credit Program 31 

Degree Student — The degree student indicates on his registration that 
he is undertaking to complete the requirements for the A.S. Degree or 
B.S. Degree in one of the Evening Credit Programs. He must satisfy all 
the admission requirements and be a fully matriculated student. 

Non-Degree Student — The non-degree student is one who does not in- 
tend to meet all the requirements tor a degree, but who wishes to select 
certain subjects which are offered as a part of the degree requirements. 
Although not seeking a degree, the non-degree student must satisfy all 
admission requirements in the same way as the degree student, thus 
making it possible for him to become a degree candidate at any registra- 
tion simply by so indicaiing on his registration. Although the student 
is not a candidate for a degree, he must be fully matriculated. 

Auditor — The classification of auditor is assigned to persons who wi^h 
merely to attend class and listen to the discussion. Since they are not 
required to meet any of the admission requirements, they are not 
privileged to participate in discussion, nor to have tests and examina- 
tions graded by the instructor; they are not subject to attendance regu- 
lations, and are not granted any credit. In fact, no record of auditors 
will be kept. 

Registration 

Degree and Non-Degree Students — There are two parts to registration: 
the completion of the registration forms and the payment of tuition. Both 
should be completed before the closing date of registration as stated in the 
calendar. There is a penalty fee for delaying either of these two processes 
beyond the closing date of registration. 

Registration is possible within office hours during the registration dates 
stated in the calendar. 

Registering must be in person at the College office. Forms are not 
mailed to students. 

A separate registration is required for each of the semesters and for the 
summer session. 

New students must be interviewed before they register. 

Changes of Registration and Schedules 

Students are urged to plan their program carefully before completing 
the registration forms in order to avoid the need for requesting changes. 
Once the registration has been completed, the student is charged the Change 
of Registration Fee for each request for change which he makes. The fee is 
charged whether or not the request is granted, and is payable when the 
student completes the form requesting the change. There is no Registration 
Change Fee charged, however, for a request to add a course. 

Schedule of Hours and Subject Load 

All courses, except four-semester-hour laboratory courses, offered in the 
Evening Credit Program are scheduled to meet from 7:00 P.M. to 9:45 P.M. 
The College is operated Monday through Friday. Subjects valued at three 



32 New Haven College 

semester hours of credit per semester meet one evening per week; those 
valued at six semester hours per semester meet two evenings per week. 

A student may carry as little as three semester hours or as many as ten, 
depending on his wishes. The same academic standards are required of the 
student regardless of the number of credits he carries. 

Placement Service for Evening Credit Students | 

The College receives requests from both students and employers for 
job placement services. Although the College does not conceive its function 
to be that of a public employment service, it is interested in and prepared 
to render placement service within the limitations of its purposes and re- | 
sources. It acts as a medium of exchange of information between students 
and former students who desire placement, and employers seeking personnel. 
It is particularly interested in helping students find positions which require 
college study or which lead to positions that require such education, and in 
assisting students to find employment related to their program of studies. 

A student or former student of the College who desires placement 
should call at the office for a placement application form and at that time 
will receive specific information as to whom he is to contact in regard to 
his placement problem. 

A company wishing to use the placement facilities of the College should 
list the job and the desired qualifications in the form of a letter. A member 
of the College staff will then contact the company to discuss procedure and 
possibilities of filling the position. 



Tuition Charges, Payments, and Refunds 

EVENING CREDIT PROGRAM 

Tuition Charges — Tuition charges are based on a rate of seventeen dollars 
($17.00) per semester hour or equivalent time for all courses offered in the 
Evening Credit Program. The charges are: 

One course (three semester hours) or equivalent $ 51.00 

One course (four semester hours) or equivalent 68.00 

Two courses (six semester hours) or equivalent 102.00 

Three courses (nine semester hours) or equivalent 153.00 

Reading Laboratory 60.00 

Payments — It is Emphasized That No Student is Registered Until He 
Has Met the Requirements of the Payment Schedule in Addition to 
the Regulations Described on Pages 28 to 31. 

All students are encouraged to make tuition payments in full in ac- 



Evening Credit Program 



33 



cordance with cash plan schedule below. However, provision is made for 
those who wish to defer their payments, the procedure for which follows: 

1 . An initial payment in cash consisting of: 

a. Partial payment of tuition. 

b. Full payment of student activity fee. 

c. Payment of a service charge of five dollars ($5.00) for the process- 
ing and servicing of a promissory note (see 2 below). 

2. The making of a promissory note (signature of parent or guardian 
required of minors) for the balance of the total tuition charges. 



Schedule of Payments 

CASH PLAN DEFERRED PLAN 

Full Initial Second Third 

Payment Payment Payment Payment 

By closing By closing 

Date oj Date of 

Fall Semester Registration Registration Nov. 1 Dec. 1 

One course (3sh) $ 52.00 No provision for deferment 

One course (4sh) 69.00 No provision for deferment 

Two courses (6sh) 104.00 159.00 $25.00 $25.00 

Three courses (9sh) 156.00 71.00 45.00 45.00 

Spring Semester Mar. 1 Apr.l 

One course (3sh) $ 52.00 No provision for deferment 

One course (4sh) 69.00 No provision for deferment 

Two courses (6sh) 104.00 $59.00 $25.00 $25.00 

Three courses (9sh) 156.00 71.00 45.00 45.00 

Summer Session July 15 Aug. 15 

One course (3sh) $ 52.00 No provision for deferment 

Two courses (6sh) 104.00 $59.00 $25.00 $25.00 

NOTE : The above schedule includes Student Activity Fee. 

Refunds — Tuition is refunded or cancelled by one of two methods: 

1. On a percentage basis prior to the fourth meeting of any class and 
for any reason. 

2. On a pro-rata basis of three dollars and fifty cents ($3.50) per class 
session at any time during a semester for specific reasons having to 
do with illness, job changes, and draft into the armed services. 

Refer to the information which follows for details of operation 

of the two methods. 

Refunds on a Percentage Basis for Withdrawals — 
Regardless of Reasons 

Refunds or cancellations are made on a per course basis, the effective 
date being the date the student notifies the College of his withdrawal. 



34 New Haven College 

If the effective date of withdrawal occurs— 

1. Any time prior to the first meeting of class, the amount refunded or 
cancelled is 80%. 

2. Any time after the first and prior to the second meeting of class, the 
amount refunded or cancelled is 60%. 

3. Any time after the second and prior to the third meeting of class, the 
amount refunded or cancelled is 40%. 

4. Any time after the third and prior to the fourth meeting of class, the 
amount refunded or cancelled is 20%. 

5. After the fourth meeting of class there is no refund or cancellation. 

Refunds will be made only when the amount of tuition actually paid 
exceeds the amount for which the student is responsible in accordance with 
the above schedule. If the amount paid is less than the amount the student 
is responsible for, then the unpaid amount must be paid on the date of the 
withdrawal notice, the promissory note being cancelled. 

Important: The student must initiate this entire procedure by informing 
the College in writing of his intention to withdraw. 

Refunds on a Pro-rata Basis for Withdrawal for Specific Reasons 

Refunds or cancellations are made on the basis of three dollars and fifty 
cents ($3.50) per class session. The student is charged at this rate for all 
sessions which have occurred prior to the date of the withdrawal notice and 
is refunded at the same rate for all sessions scheduled after the withdrawal 
notice. Refunds are made only when the amount of tuition actually paid 
exceeds the charge. If the amount paid is less than the amount for which the 
student is responsible, then the balance owed by the student is immediately 
payable, the promissory note being cancelled. 

Refunds will be made at any time during any semester, but only for 
the following reasons: 

1. Protracted illness of the student evidenced by a letter or certificate 
from the attending physician. 

2. Induction (not enlistment) into the armed services, evidenced by a 
photostatic copy of the draft notice. 

3. Job changes initiated by the employer involving: 

a. A change to a shift which precludes meeting the College's sched- 
ule of classes or 

b. A change to a location which is beyond the normal commuting 
distance from the College, both of which must be evidenced by a 
letter written on company stationery and signed by an officer of 
the employing company. 

Important: The student must initiate this entire procedure by informing 
the College in writing of his intention to withdraw. After the 
withdrawal notice and upon receipt by the College of the evi- 
dence referred to above, the refund will be made. 



Evening Credit Program 35 

Fees — Evening Credit Program 

Application Fee |5.00 

Payable only once at the initial time of application. Not Refundable. 

Tuition — See pages 32 to 33. 

Student Activity Fee $1.00 

Charged at the rate of $1.00 per three semester hour course per 
semester. Not Refundable. 

Promissory Note Service Charge $5.00 

Payable at the time each promissory note is made. Not Refundable. 

Late Fee $2.00 

Assessed for failure to submit registration forms or to make the initial 
required tuition payments by the closing date of registration each 
semester. Not Refundable. 

Change of Registration Fee $2.00 

This fee is assessed following submission of registration cards in all 
cases involving: 
Dropping a course or courses 
Substituting courses 

Requesting assignment to a different section of the same course 
where no preference has previously been stated. Not Refund- 
able. 

Make-Up Examination Fee $5.00 

Assessed when a student requires an end-of-semester examination at 
other than the scheduled time except for conflicts caused by the 
examination schedule. Not Refundable. 

Crediting Examination Fee $15.00 

Assessed for each examination requested by a student for the purpose 
of establishing credit in lieu of taking a course. Not Refundable. 

Graduation Fee $15.00 

Payable one month prior to graduation. Not Refundable, 

Laboratory and Breakage Fee $12.50 

Payable each semester by students registering for courses requiring 
the laboratory fee— See Course Descriptions. 



The Summer Session 

of the 

Evening Credit Program 



The College offers a summer session with these primary functions: 

1. To offer opportunity for summer study to those residents of the New 
Haven area who attend other schools during the regular school year. 
For financial reasons, most of these students find it desirable to live 
at home and work during the summer. The summer program of the 
College is confined to evening classes; therefore, it is possible to work 
during the day and attend classes in the evening. Reasons for sum- 
mer study vary, but are generally confined to the following: 

a. To make up deficiencies. 

b. To satisfy prerequisites for courses in the parent institution. 

c. To acquire advanced standing in the parent school. 

Experience has shown that the credits earned at the College are 
acceptable to parent institutions. The College is a member of the 
New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. For 
additional assurance of the acceptance of credit by the parent school, 
prior approval by that school is advisable. 

2. To provide opportunity for summer study to the students of the 
College. Reasons for summer study for this group of students may be 
described as follows: 

a. To lighten the study load during the regular school year, but 
still meet the yearly requirements of the four year program. 

b. To shorten the normal time required for a degree. 

c. To take preparatory work. 

d. To make up deficiencies caused by failure in certain courses. 

e. To take additional work beyond the degree requirements and 
yet complete a program within the normal time of four years. 

Note: The accomplishment of any one of the five objectives listed 
above will depend on the specific subjects offered during any summer session. 

Registration — For all new students a personal interview with a staff mem- 
ber of the College is necessary. Registration procedures will be explained at 
this time. For those new students who desire work for credit in other insti- 
tutions, prior approval should be obtained from those institutions (see 1 
above). This procedure should be followed each semester regardless of pre- 
vious attendance. 

36 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 



Evening Credit Program 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Associate in Science Programs 
Bachelor of Science Programs 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



Associate in Science Programs 



PROGRAM OF GENERAL STUDIES 

It is recognized that there are certain groups of students who desire a 
general education. These students may be categorized as follows: 

Those who wish a college degree in the field of general studies, but 
who do not desire to spend four years in a senior college. 

Those who have not yet decided which technical field they want to 
specialize in, but who, in the meantime, desire an education of a 
general nature. 

Those who want a general education and degree at junior college 
level for later transfer to a senior college for a bachelor's degree. 

Those college graduates of technical programs who now find that 
their need lies in the field of general studies and the corresponding 
acquisition of educational breadth. 

The College is meeting the needs of these students by offering the pro- 
gram outlined below. The degree Associate in Science in General Studies is 
awarded upon the successful completion of the requirements. A total of 60 
semester hours of study is required. 

The total hours required are distributed as follows: 

I. Required Courses, totaling 36 sem. hrs. 

•E 113 English Composition 3 s.h. 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

E 118 Modern Literature (Spring Only) 3 s.h. 

E 201-202 Humanities 6 s.h. 

EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. 

P 111 Psychology 3 s.h. 

PHIL 111 Philosophy 

or 3 s.h. 

PHIL 113 History of Philosophy 

SC 111-112 Modern Science 6 s.h. 

SS 113-114 Sociology 6 s.h. 

or 

SS 121-122 Political Science 6 s.h. 

II. Elective Courses, totaling 24 sem. hrs. 

To be selected from any credit offerings of the College for which the 

student satisfies prerequisites. See course descriptions. 

Total Hours Required for the Associate in Science Degree 60 sem. hrs. 

• Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examination. 

For other courses available as substitutes or electives at Quinnipiac 
College, consult the Dean. 

38 



Evening Credit Program 



39 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(Associate in Science) 

In order to acquire the Associate in Science in Business Administration, 
all students are required to take a basic program which includes accounting, 
law, economics, general studies, and business. The successful completion of 
these courses earns the student the sixty-three semester hours of credit re- 
quired for the degree. 

This program represents the first half of the Bachelor of Science pro- 
gram in Business Administration. See Page 48. 

Required Courses, totaling 63 sem hrs. 

First Year 



Fall 
A 111 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. A 112 

BA 101 Law of Contracts & Bus. BA 102 

Associations 3 s.h. 

•E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. IE 114 



Spring 
Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. 
Law of Contracts & Bus. 

Associations 3 s.h. 

Management Survey 3 s.h. 



Second Year 



BA 113 Business Finance 3 s.h. 

EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. 

P 111 Psychology 3 s.h. 



BA 118 Business Mathematics .. 3 s.h. 
EC 202 Economic History of U.S. 3 s.h. 
E 220 Technical Report 

Writing 3 s.h. 



Third Year 



BA 111 Principles of Sales 3 s.h. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. 

PS 223 Personnel Administra- 
tion 3 s.h. 



BA 112 Principles of Marketing 3 s.h. 

E 202 Humanities 3 s.h. 

PS 225 Human Relations in 

Management 3 s.h. 



E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

BA 131 Public Relations 3 s.h. 



Fourth Year 

PS 244 



Management Labor 
Relations 3 s.h. 



or 



BA 216 Business Statistics 3 s.h. 

Total Required for Degree 63 sem. hrs. 

* Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examination. 



40 



New Haven College 



ACCOUNTING 

(Associate in Science) 

In order to acquire the Associate in Science in Accounting, all students 
are required to take basic courses in accounting, law, English, and economics. 
The successful completion of these courses earns the student the sixty-three 
semester hours credit required for the degree. 

This program represents approximately the first half of the Bachelor of 
Science program in Accounting. See page 47. 

Required Courses, totaling 63 sem. hrs. 

First Year 



Fall 

A 111 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. 
BA 101 Law of Contracts & Bus. 

Associations 3 s.h. 

*E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. 



Spring 

A 112 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. 
BA 102 Law of Contracts & Bus. 

Associations 3 sJi. 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 



Second Year 



A 221 Intermediate Account- A 222 

ing 3 s.h. 

A 223 Cost Accounting 3 s.h. A 224 

EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. EC 202 



Intermediate Account- 
ing 3 s.h. 

Cost Accounting 3 s.h. 

Economic History of U.S. 3 s.h. 



Third Year 



A 331 Advanced Accounting .... 3 s.h. A 332 

A 333 Auditing 3 s.h. A 334 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 



Advanced Accounting .... 3 sJi. 

Auditing 3 s.h. 

Humanities 3 s.h. 



BA 113 Business Finance 3 s.h 

E 220 Technical Report 

Writing 3 sJi 



Fourth Year 

BA 118 Business Mathematics 



3 s.h. 



Total Required for Degree 63 sem. hrs. 

• Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examination. 



Evening Credit Program 



41 



MANAGEMENT 

(Associate in Science) 



The Program of Management is designed for persons whose administra- 
tive responsibilities may be in a staff department deahng with materials, 
methods, and personnel phases of business. It does not include technical 
engineering work. 

In order to acquire the Associate in Science in Management all students 
must take a pattern of required courses. The successful completion of the 
required courses earns the student the sixty-six hours required for the 
degree. 

Required Courses, totaling 66 sem. hrs. 



Fall 

A 111 Introductory Accounting 3 
BA 101 Law of Contracts & Bus. 

Associations 3 

*E 113 English Composition .... 3 



First Year 

Spring 

s-h. A 112 Introductory Accounting 3 

BA 102 Law of Contracts & Bus. 

sJi. Associations 3 

s.h. E 114 Speech 3 

Second Year 



s.h. 

s.h. 
s.h. 



Fall 



EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. 

P 111 Psychology 3 sii. 

IE 114 Management Survey 3 s.h. 



Spring 
BA 118 Business Mathematics .. 3 s.h. 
EC 202 Economic History of U.S. 3 s.h. 
E 220 Technical Report 

Writing 3 s.h. 



Third Year 

BA 111 Princ. of Selling 3 s.h. BA 112 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 

PS 223 Personnel Administra- PS 225 

tion 3 sJi. 



Princ. of Marketing 3 s.h. 

Humanities 3 sJi. 

Human Relations in 

Management 3 s.h. 



Fourth Year 



BA 113 Business Finance 3 s.h. 

IE 133 Cost Control 3 s.h. 



BA 118 
IE 134 

PS 244 



Business Mathematics .... 3 sJi. 

Production Control 3 s.h. 

Management Labor 
Relations 3 s.h. 



Total Required for Degree 66 sem. hrs. 

* Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examination. 



42 New Haven College 

GENERAL ENGINEERING 

(Associate in Science) 

The primary purpose of the General Engineering program is to meet 
the needs of those students who have reason not to specialize in any of the 
specific fields of engineering offered by the College (Electrical, Industrial, 
Mechanical, and Metallurgical). Their particular need may cut across any 
two or more of these special fields. 

Since most of the technical electives and some of the non-technical ones 
are offered in alternate years, it is extremely important that the student con- 
sult with the department chairman or a staff advisor during the latter por- 
tion of his second year in order to outline his program for the third and 
fourth years. 

Requirements for the degree fall into two groups and are outlined 
below. 

I. Required Courses totaling 50 sem. hrs. 

First Year 

Fall Spring 

•M 113 Trigonometry 3 s.h. *M 114 Algebra & Analytic 

D 111 Engineering Drawing .... 3 s.h. Geometry 3 s.h. 

•E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. D 112 Drawing & Descriptive 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

Second Year 

Fall Spring 

PH 211 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. PH 212 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 Humanities 3 s.h. 

A 113 Industrial Accounting .. 3 s.h. IE 114 Management Survey 3 s.h. 

Third and Fourth Years 

MT 119 Engineering Materials .. 3 s.h. EE 222 Elem. of Electrical Engr. 3 s.h. 

IE 134 Production Control .... 3 s.h. E 220 Technical Report 

Restricted Electives Writing 3 s.h. 

Restricted Electives 

II. Restricted Electives totaling 15 sem. hrs. 

(Restricted electives are selected from the courses listed below) 

CH 201-202 Engineering Chemistry (with 

lab.) 8 s.h. 

D 333-334 Machine Design 6 s.h. (Offered in Fall of even years) 

D 335-336 Tool Design 6 s.h. (Offered in Fall of odd years) 

EC 113 Economics 3 s.h. 

EC 204 Engineering Economics 3 s.h. 

EE 233 Basic Electronics 3 s.h. 

EE 236 Industrial Electronics 3 s.h. 

EM 124 Mechanical Processes 3 s.h. 

EM 221 Mechanics-Statics 3 sJi. 

EM 234 Strength of Materials 3 s.h. 

IE 119 Industrial Safety and Hygiene .. 3 s.h. 

IE 133 Cost Control 3 s.h. 

M 221-222 DifF. and Integral Calculus 6 s.h. 

MT 220 Metallography 3 s.h. 

Total Required for Degree 65 sem. hrs. 

Entrance into these courses is permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examinations. 



Evening Credit Program 43 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

(Associate in Science) 

The Electrical Engineering program is designed so that the first three 
and one-half years consist of a sequence of courses required of all students. 
This sequence may be described as basic for electrical engineering. The suc- 
cessful completion of this sequence establishes the student as a candidate 
for the Associate in Science in Electrical Engineering. In order to complete 
the degree requirements, the student must acquire at least fifteen semester 
hours of credit beyond the basic sequence requirements of fifty-six semester 
hours making a total of seventy-one semester hours of credit. 

During the latter part of his second year, the student should consult the 
department chairman or a staff advisor to outline the sequence of courses 
for the remaining portion of his degree requirements. Since some electives 
are offered on an alternate year basis, proper planning is essential. 

I. Required Courses totaling 56 sem. hrs. 

First Year 

Fall Spring 

*M 113 Trigonometry 3 s.h. *M 114 Algebra & Analytic 

D 111 Engineering Drawing .... 3 s.h. Geometry 3 s.h. 

*E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. D 112 Drawing & Descriptive 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

Second Year 

M 221 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. M 222 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. 

PH 211 Engineering Physics PH 212 Engineering Physics 

(with lab) 4 s.h. (with lab) 4 s.h. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 Humanities 3 s.h. 

Third Year 

M 323 Adv. Math, for Engr. I 3 s.h. EE 224 Prin. of Electrical Engr. 3 s.h. 

EE 223 Prin. of Electrical Engr. 3 s.h. E 220 Technical Report 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. Writing 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Fourth Year 

EE 331 Alternating Current EE 332 Alternating Current 

Circuits 3 sii. Circuits 3 s.h. 

Restricted Electives Restricted Electives 

II. Restricted Electives totaling 15 sem. hrs. 

The restricted electives are to be selected from the following courses: 

EE 233 Basic Electronics 3 sJi. EE 236 Industrial Electronics .... 3 s.h. 

EE 235 Direct Current Machines 3 s.h. EE 242 A. C. Machines 3 s.h. 

EE 347- Electronic Engineering .. 6 sJi. CH 201- Engineering Chemistry .. 8 s.h. 

348 202 (with lab.) 

EM 221 Mechanics-Statics 3 sJi. EM 322 Mechanics-Dynamics .... 3 s.h. 

M 324 Adv. Math for Engr. II 3 s.h. 

Total Required for Degree 71 sem. hrs. 

• Entrance into these courses is permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examinations. 



44 



New Haven College 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

(Associate in Science) 

The Industrial Engineering program combines basic mechanical engi- 
neering with study in the field of industrial engineering. The Associate in 
Science in Industrial Engineering is awarded upon completion of all re- 
quirements. 

This program represents approximately the first half of the Bachelor of 
Science program in Industrial Engineering. See page 50. 

I. Required Courses totaling 70 sem. hrs. 



First Year 



*M 113 

D 111 

*E 113 



Fall 

Trigonometry 

Engineering Drawing 
English Composition 



3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 



*M 114 
D 112 
IE 114 



Spring 

Algebra & Analytic 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

Drawing & Descriptive 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

Management Survey 3 s.h. 



Second Year 



M 221 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. 
PH 211 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. 
EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. 



M 222 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. 
PH 212 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. 
EC 204 Engineering Economics .. 3 s.h. 



Third Year 



MT 119 Engineering Materials .. 3 s.h. 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. 



EE 222 

E 202 
EM 124 



Elements of Electrical 

Engr 3 s.h. 

Humanities 3 s.h. 

Mechanical Processes .... 3 s.h. 



IE 241 Methods & Motion Study 3 s.h. 
CH 201 Engr. Chemistry (with 

lab.) 4 s.h. 



Fourth Year 

E 220 



Technical Report 

Writing ^ 3 s.h, 

CH 202 Engr. Chemistry (with 

lab.) 4 s.h. 

* Entrance into these courses permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examinations. 



Evening Credit Program 45 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

(Associate in Science) 

The Mechanical Engineering program consists in the first three years of 
a sequence of courses totahng fifty-six semester hours required of all stu- 
dents. This sequence may be called basic mechanical engineering. The 
successful completion of this sequence establishes the student as a candidate 
for the Associate in Science in Mechanical Engineering. In order to com- 
plete the requirements for the degree, the student must acquire at least 
fifteen semester hours of credit, making a total of seventy-one hours of credit. 
These fifteen hours must be taken in advanced courses in engineering, listed 
under Restricted Electives. 

During the latter part of his second year, the student should consult a 
staff advisor in order to plan the sequence of courses for the remaining por- 
tion of his degree requirements. Since many of the electives are offered in 
alternate years, proper planning is essential. 

I. Required Courses totaling 56 sem. hrs. 

First Year 
Fall Spring 

*M 113 Trigonometry 3 s.h. *M 114 Algebra & Analytic 

Dill Engineering Drawing .... 3 s.h. Geometry 3 s.h. 

•E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. D 112 Drawing & Descriptive 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

Second Year 

M 221 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. M 222 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. 
PH 211 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. PH 212 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. 
MT 119 Engineering Materials .. 3 s.h. EM 124 Mechanical Processes 3 sJh. 

Third and Fourth Years 

EM 221 Mechanics-Statics 3 sJi. EM 322 Mechanics— Dynamics .... 3 s.h. 

E 220 Technical Report EE 222 Elera. Electrical Engr. .. 3 s.h. 

Writing 3 s.h. E 202 Humanities 3 sJi. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. 

II. Restricted Electives totaling 15 sem. hrs. 

CH 201-202 Engineering Chemistry (with 

lab.) 8 s.h. 

D 333-334 Machine Design 6 s.h. (Offered in Fall of even years) 

D 335-336 Tool Design 6 s.h. (Offered in Fall of odd years) 

D 441-442 Adv. Machine Design 6 s.h. (Offered in Fall of odd years) 

D 445-446 Tool Engineering 6 s.h. (Offered in Fall of even years) 

EM 333 Mechanisms 3 s.h. (Fall) 

EM 234 Strength of Materials 3 s.h. (Spring) 

EM 405 Fluid Mechanics 3 s.h. (Fall) 

PH 315 Nuclear Physics 3 s.h. (Fall) 

PH 331-332 Thermodynamics & Heat Power 6 s.h. 

Total Required for Degree 71 sem. hrs. 

• Entrance into these courses permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examinations. 



46 



New Haven College 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

(Associate in Science) 

The Metallurgical Engineering Program is designed so that the first 
three years contain a sequence of courses required of all students. Successful 
completion of this sequence of fifty-eight semester hours establishes the stu- 
dent as a candidate for the Associate in Science in Metallurgical Engineer- 
ing. In order to complete the degree requirements, the student must acquire 
twelve additional semester hours credit to be elected from restricted elec- 
tives, at least six of which must be in Metallurgy. 

Since the first opportunity for elective courses occurs in the fourth year, 
the student must consult a staff advisor during the latter portion of his third 
year so that the course sequence may be arranged. Since some of the electives 
are offered in alternate years, proper planning is essential. 

Requirements for the degree fall into two groups and are outlined 
below: 

I. Required courses totaling 58 sem. hrs. 



*M 113 

D 111 

*E 113 



Fall 

Trigonometry 

Engineering Drawing 
English Composition 



First Year 



3 s.h. *M 114 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. D 112 

E 114 



Spring 

Algebra & Analytic 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

Drawing & Descriptive 

Geometry 3 sli. 

Speech 3 s.h. 



Second Year 

M 221 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. M 222 

PH 211 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. PH 212 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 



Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. 
Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. 
Humanities 3 s.h. 



Third Year 

CH 201 Engr. Chemistry (with CH 202 

lab.) 4 s.h. 

EM 221 Mechanics-Statics 3 s.h. MT 220 

MT 119 Engineering Materials .. 3 s.h. E 220 



Engr. Chemistry (with 

lab.) 4 s.h. 

Metallography 3 s.h. 

Technical Report 
Writing 3 s.h. 



II. Restricted Electives 12 sem. hrs. 



EE 222 Elements of Electrical Engr 3 s.h. 

EM 124 Mechanical Processes 3 s.h. 

MT 224 Nuclear Metallurgy 3 s.h. 

MT 331-332 Non Ferrous Metallurgy 6 s.h. 

MT 341-342 Steels & Their Heat Treatment .. 6 s.h. 

EM 234 Strength of Materials 3 s.h. 

EM 322 Mechanics— Dynamics 3 s.h. 

PH 315 Nuclear Physics 3 s.h. 



(Spring) 
(Spring) 
(Spring) 

(Offered in Fall of odd years) 
(Offered in Fall of even years) 
(Spring) 
(Spring) 
(Fall) 



Total Required for Degree 70 sem. hrs. 

Entrance into these courses permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examinations. 



Evening Credit Program 47 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS 

Business: Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Business by 
majoring in Accounting or Business Administration. 

Engineering: Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineer- 
ing by majoring in Industrial Engineering. Through the completion of the 
required courses and through the selection of electives, students may gain 
knowledge in the fields of electrical, mechanical, or metallurgical engineer- 
ing; or in the field of personnel administration. 

Industrial Management: Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Industrial Management through the completion of required and elective 
courses in management, cost, personnel and basic engineering. 

ACCOUNTING 

(Bachelor of Science) 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Accounting, all students 
are required to take basic courses in accounting, business and liberal arts. 
The successful completion of these courses grants the student one hundred 
and five semester hours credit of the one hundred twenty-six hours required 
for the degree. Of the remaining twenty-one hours of credit required for 
the degree, fifteen hours must be elected from the group of restricted elec- 
tives listed below. The remaining six semester hours credit are elected 
from any field of study. Prerequisites for all electives must be satisfied either 
by formal courses or by equivalent practical experience. 
I. Required courses, totaling 105 sem. hrs. 

First Year 

Fall Spring 

A 111 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. A 112 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. 

BA 101 Law of Contracts & BA 102 Law of Contracts & 

Bus. Associations 3 s.h. Bus. Associations 3 s.h. 

*E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

Second Year 
A 221 Intermediate Accounting 3 s.h. A 222 Intermediate Accounting 3 s.h. 

EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. EC 202 Economic History of U.S. 3 s.h. 

IE 114 Management Survey 3 s.h. E 220 Technical Report 

Writing 3 s.h. 

Third Year 

A 223 Cost Accounting 3 s.h. A 224 Cost Accounting 3 s.h. 

A 331 Advanced Accounting .... 3 s.h. A 332 Advanced Accounting .... 3 s.h. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 Humanities 3 s.h. 

Fourth Year 

A 333 Auditing 3 s.h. A 334 Auditing 3 s.h. 

BA 113 Business Finance 3 s.h. BA 118 Business Mathematics .... 3 s.h. 

P 111 Psychology 3 s.h. Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Fifth Year 
A 335 Income Tax Procedure .. 3 sh. A 336 Income Tax Procedure .. 3 sJi. 

PS 223 Personnel Administra- PS 225 Human Relations in 

tion 3 s.h. Management 3 sJi. 

Social Studies Elective SS 113 Social Studies Elective SS 114 
or SS 121 3 sJi. or SS 122 — 3 si. 



48 New Haven College 

Sixth Year 

A 443 Accounting Systems I .... 3 s.h. BA 216 Business Statistics 3 s.h. 

Science Elective SC 111, PH 211, Science Elective SC 112, PH 212 

CH 201 3 s.h. CH 202 3 s.h. 

Philosophy 111 or 113 3 s.h. EC 442 Economic Thought 3 s.h. 

Seventh Year 
(Restricted and Unrestricted Elcctives totaling 21 semester hours) 

II. Restricted Electives totaling 15 semester hours are selected from the following courses: 

BA 111 Principles of Sales 3 s.h. BA 221 Law of Sales 3 s.h. 

BA 112 Marketing 3 s.h. BA 222 Law of Commercial 

BA 119 Office Org. & Mgmt 3 s.h. Paper & Bankruptcy .. 3 s.h. 

BA 113 Business Finance 3 s.h. EC 236 Money and Banking 3 s.h. 

BA 131 Public Relations 3 s.h. PS 244 Management and Labor 

Relations 3 s.h. 

III. Unrestricted Electives total 6 semester hours. (Any credit courses offered by the 

College). 

Total Required for the Degree 126 sem. hrs. 

* Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examination. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(Bachelor of Science) 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, 
students must take a pattern of business courses. The successful completion 
of these courses grants the student ninety-six semester hours of credit of the 
1 26 semester hours required for the degree. Of the remaining thirty semester 
hours beyond the required pattern, the student must elect eighteen semester 
hours from the field of business. The remaining twelve semester hours may 
be elected from the field of business or from any other field of study. Pre- 
requisites for all electives must be satisfied either by formal courses or by 
equivalent practical experience. 

I. Required courses, totaling 96 sem. hrs. 

First Year 
Fall Spring 

A 111 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. A 112 Introductory Accounting 3 s.h. 

BA 101 Law of Contracts & BA 102 Law of Contracts & 

Bus. Associations 3 s.h. Bus. Associations 3 s.h. 

*E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. IE 114 Management Survey .... 3 s.h. 

Second Year 

BA 113 Business Finance 3 s.h. BA 118 Business Mathematics .. 3 s.h. 

EC 133 Ecrnomics 3 s.h. EC 202 Economic History of U.S. 3 s.h. 

Pill Psychology 3 s.h. E 220 Technical Report 

Writing 3 s.h. 

Third Year 

BA 111 Principles of Sales 3 s.h. BA 112 Principles of Marketing 3 s.h. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 Humanities 3 s.h. 

PS 223 Personnel Administra- PS 225 Human Relations in 

tion 3 s.h. Management 3 s.h. 



Evening Credit Program 49 

Fourth Year 

BA 221 Law of Sales 3 8.h. BA 222 Law of Commercial 

E 114 Speech 3 sJi. Paper & Bankruptcy .. 3 s.h. 

Science Elective SC 112, PH 211, or PS 244 Management Labor 

CH 201 3 sJi. Relations 3 s.h. 

Science Elective SC 113, PH 212. 

CH 202 3 s.h. 

Fifth Year 

BA 131 Public Relations 3 s.h. BA 216 Business Statistics 3 s.h. 

BA 211 Advertising 3 sJi. EC 236 Money and Banking .... 3 8.h. 

Social Studies Elective SS 113 Social Studies Elective SS 114 or 

or SS 121 3 s.h. SS 122 3 s.h. 

Sixth and Seventh Year 

PHIL 111 or 113 3 s.h. EC 442 Economic Thought 3 s.h. 

(Restricted and unrestricted electives totaling 30 s.h.) 

II. Restricted Electives totahng 18 semester hours are to be selected from the following 

courses: 

A 221, BA 342 Market Research _ 3 s.h. 

222 Intermediate Accounting 6 sJi. P 112 Industrial Psychology .... 3 s.h. 

BA 113 Business Finance 3 sJi. PS 242 Conference Leadership .. 3 s.h. 

BA 119 Office Org. and Mgmt. .. 3 s.h. 

IE 133 Cost Control 3 s.h. 

IE 134 Production Control 3 s.h. 

III. Unrestricted Electives totaling 12 semester hours 12 sem. hrs. 

(Any credit courses offered by the College) 

Total Required for Degree 126 sem hrs. 

• Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examination. 

INDUSTRIAL MANAGOMENT 

(Bachelor of Science) 

The Program of Industrial Management is designed for persons whose 
administrative responsibilities may be in a staff department dealing with 
production, cost and personnel phases of business. It includes engineemig 
work at the fundamental level. 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management, 
all students must take a pattern of required courses. The successful com- 
pletion of the required courses earns the student 107 hours of the 128 se- 
mester hours required for the d^ree. Of th remaining 21 semester hours 
beyond the required pattern, the student must elect fifteen hours from re- 
stricted electives while the remaining six semester hours may be elected 
from any field of study. Students succssfully completing the first 64 semester 
hours of this program may request and receive the Associate in Science de- 
gree in Industrial Management provided all requirements as outlined on 
page 24 have been met. 
I. Required courses, totaling 107 sem. hrs. 

Program of Study 

First Year 

Fall Spring 

A 111 Intro. Accounting 3 sJi. A 112 Intro. Accounting 3 s.h. 

•E 113 EngUsh Composition .... 3 s.h. E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 

•M 113 Trigonometry 3 s.h. •M 114 Algebra & Analytic 

Geometry 3 s.h. 



50 



New Haven College 



Second Year 



BA 101 

EC 133 
IE 114 



E 201 
P 111 
PH 211 



BA 111 
PS 223 

SS 121 

or 
SS 113 



BA 113 
IE 133 
MT 119 



Law of Contracts & 
Business Association .. 3 s.h. 

Economics 3 sJi. 

Management Survey .... 3 s.h. 



BA 102 Law of Contracts & 

Business Association .. 3 six. 
E 220 Technical Report 

Writing 3 sJi. 

EC 202 Economic History of 

U. S. _ _ 3 sh. 



Third Year 

Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 

Psychology 3 s.h. BA 118 

Engineering Physics 4 sii. PH 212 

Fourth Year 
Principles of Sales 3 s.h. BA 112 



Personnel Administra- 
tion 3 sJi. 

Social Studies Elective 3 sii. 



Fifth 

Business Finance 3 s.h. 

Cost Control 3 sJi. 

Engineering Materials .. 3 sJi. 



Sixth 

IE 119 Industrial Safety & 

Hygiene 3 sJi. 

IE 241 Methods & Motion 

Study 3 sJi. 

PHIL 111 Philosophy 3 sJi. 

or 113 

(Restricted and unrestricted electives totaling 

II. Restricted Electives totaling 15 semester 
courses: 

A 221- 
222 
BA 211 
BA 342 
BA 113- 
114 
BA 131 



PS 244 

SS 122 

or 
SS 114 

Year 

BA 216 
EM 124 
IE 134 

Year 

BA 342 
PS 225 



Humanities 3 sJi. 

Business Mathematics .. 3 sJi. 
Engineering Physics 3 sJi. 



Principles of Marketing 3 sJi. 
Management Labor 

Relations 3 sJi. 

Social Studies Elective 3 sJi. 



Business Statistics 3 sJi. 

Mechanical Processes .... 3 sii. 
Production Control 3 sJi. 



Marketing Research 3 s.h. 

Human Relations in 
Management 3 sJi. 



21 semester hours.) 

hours are to be selected from the following 



Intermediate Accounting 6 sJi. 

Advertising 3 sJi. 

Marketing Research 3 s.h. 

Business Finance 6 sJi. 

Public Relations _ 3 sJi, 



D 111- 
112 
EC 204 
EC 236 
IE 342 
PS 242 



Engineering Drawing 3 sJi. 

Engineering Economics 3 s.h. 

Money and Banking 3 s.h. 

Work Measurements .... 3 sJi. 
Conference Leadership.. 3 sJi. 



HI. Unrestricted Electives totaling 6 semester hours 6 sem. hrs. 

(Any credit courses offered by the College) 

Total Required for the Degree 128 sem. hrs. 

* Entrance into this course is permitted upon satisfactory performance on placement 
examination. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

(Bachelor of Science) 

The Program of Industrial Engineering is planned to prepare students 
to apply the engineering method to the problems of management in in- 
dustry. 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, 
all students must take a pattern of required courses. The successful com- 
pletion of the required courses earns the student 131 hours of the 140 



Evening Credit Program 



51 



semester hours of credit required for the degree. The remaining nine hours 
of credit are selected from restricted electives in the fields of study indicated 
below. 

Required courses, totaling „ _ — 131 sem. hrs. 



First Year 



Fall 

*M 113 Trigonometry 

D 111 Engineering Drawing 
*E 113 English Composition 



3 s.h. 
3 sJi. 
3 s.h. 



•M 114 
D 112 
IE 114 



Second Year 

M 221 Di£E. & Integral Calculus 3 sJi. M 222 

PH 211 Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 sJi. PH 212 

EC 133 Economics 3 sli. EC 204 

Third Year 

P 111 Psychology 3 s.h. EE 222 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 

MT 119 Engineering Materials .. 3 sJi. EM 124 

Fourth Year 

A 113 Industrial Accounting .. 3 s.h. E 220 

CH 201 Engr. Chemistry (with 

lab.) - 4 sJi. CH 202 

PS 223 Personnel Administra- 
tion 3 sJi. PS 244 



Spring 

Algebra & Analytic 

Geometry 3 sii. 

Drawing & Descriptive 

Geometry 3 sJi. 

Management Survey 3 sJi. 



Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 sJi. 
Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 sJi. 
Engineering Economics .. 3 s Ji. 



Elements of Elect. Engr. 3 sJi. 

Humanities 3 sJi. 

Mechanical Processes 3 sJi. 



Technical Report 

Writing 3 sJx. 

Engr. Chemistry (with 

lab.) 4 bJi. 

Management Labor 

Relations 3 sJi. 



Fifth Year 

M 323 Adv. Mathematics for EE 236 

Engr. I _ 3 s.h. EM 322 

EM 221 Mechanics-Statics 3 sii. PS 225 

E 114 Speech 3 s.h. 



Sixth Year 



Industrial Electronics 3 s.h. 

Mechanics— Dynamics .... 3 s.h. 
Human Relations in 

Management 3 s.h. 



IE 133 Cost Control 3 s.h. 

PH 331 Thermodynamics 3 s.h. 

Social Studies Elective SS 113 or 
SS 121 3 sJi. 



IE 134 Production Control 3 s.h. 

PH 332 Thermodynamics 3 sJi. 

Social Studies Elective SS 114 or 

SS 122 3 s.h. 



Seventh Year 

IE 435 Statistical Methods (with IE 422 

lab.) 4 sJi. IE 436 

IE 241 Methods & Motion IE 342 

Studies 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 



Analytical Methods 3 sii. 

Quality Control 3 sJi. 

Work Measurements 3 six. 



Eighth Year 

IE 443 Factory Planning 3 s.h. Restricted Elective 3 sJi. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Restricted Electives— 9 sem. hrs. These electives must be selected from the following areas: 
Drawing and Design, Engineering, or Personnel Supervision. 

Total Required for Degree 140 sem. hrs. 

* Entrance into these courses is permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examinations. 



62 



New Haven College 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING— ELECTRICAL OPTION 

(Bachelor of Science) 

The Industrial Engineering-Electrical Option program combines basic 
electrical engineering with study in the field of industrial engineering. 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering- 
Electrical Option, all students must take a pattern of required courses. The 
successful completion of the required courses earns the student 130 hours of 
the 142 semester hours of credit required for the degree. The remaining 
twelve hours of credit are selected from restricted electives in the fields of 
study indicated below. 
Required courses, totaling 130 sem. hrs. 



•M 113 

D 111 

•E 113 



M 221 
PH 211 
E 201 

M 323 
EE 223 
EE 235 

EE 331 
EE 233 
IE 114 



Fall 

Trigonometry 3 s.h 

Engineering Drawing 3 s.h 

English Composition .... 3 s.h 



First Year 

•M 114 
D 112 
E 114 



Second Year 
Diff. and Int. Calculus .. 3 s.h. M 222 

Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 sJi. PH 212 

Humanities 3 sJi. E 202 

Third Year 
Adv. Math, for Engr. I .. 3 s.h. M 324 

Prin. of Electrical Engr. 3 s.h. EE 224 

Direct Current Machines 3 s.h. EE 242 

Fourth Year 

A. C. Circuits 3 sJi. EE 332 

Basic Electronics 3 sJi. EE 236 

Management Survey 3 s.h. P 111 



CH 201 Engineering Chemistry 

(with laboratory^ 

MT 119 Engineering Materials . 
EC 133 Economics 



EM 221 Mechanics— Statics 

IE 133 Cost Control 

PS 223 Personnel Administra- 
tion 



Fifth Year 

CH 202 
4 s.h. 

3 sJi. EM 124 

3 s.h. EC 204 

Sixth Year 
3 s.h. EM 322 

3 sii. IE 134 

E 220 
3 sJi. 



Spring 

Algebra and Analytic 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

Drawing and Descriptive 

Geometry 3 s.h. 

Speech 3 sJi. 

Diff. and Int. Calculus .. 3 s.h. 
Engr. Physics (with lab.) 4 s.h. 
Humanities 3 sJi. 

Adv. Math, for Engr. II 3 s.h. 
Prin. of Electrical Engr. 3 s.h. 
A. C. Machines 3 sJh. 



A. C. Circuits 3 sJi. 

Industrial Electronics 3 sJi. 

Psychology 3 sJi. 



Engineering Chemistry 

(with laboratory) 4 sJi. 

Mechanical Processes .... 3 s.h. 
Engineering Economics .. 3 s.h. 

Mechanics— Dynamics .... 3 s.h. 

Production Control 3 sJi. 

Technical Report 
Writing 3 sJi. 



IE 241 Methods & Motion Study 
Social Studies Elective SS 113 or 

SS 121 

Restricted Elective 



Seventh Year 
3 s.h. IE 342 Work Measurements .... 3 s.h. 

Social Studies Elective SS 114 or 

3 s.h. SS 122 3 sji. 

3 s.h. Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Eighth Year 

IE 443 Factory Planning 3 s.h. IE 422 Analytical Methods 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 sJi. Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Restricted Electives totaling 12 semester hours are to be selected from the following areas: 

Drawing, and Design, Engineering, Industrial Management or Personnel Supervision. 

Total Required for Degree 142 sem. hrs. 

• Entrance to these courses permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examinations. 



Evening Credit Program 53 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING^MECHANICAL OPTION 

(Bachelor of Science) 

The Industrial Engineering-Mechanical Option program combines bas- 
ic mechanical engineering with study in the field of industrial engineering. 
In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering- 
Mechanical Option, all students must take a pattern of required courses. 
The successful completion of the required courses earns the student 130 
hours of the 142 semester hours of credit required for the degree. The re- 
maining twelve hours of credit are selected from restricted electives in the 
fields of study indicated below. 
Required Courses, totaling 130 sem. hrs. 

First Year 

Fall Spring 

•M 113 Trigonometry 3 s.h. *M 114 Algebra & Analytic 

D 111 Engineering Drawing .. 3 s.h. Geometry 3 s.h. 

•E 113 English Composition .... 3 s.h. D 112 Eng. Dwg. & Desc. 

Geom 3 s.h. 

E 114 Speech 3 si. 

Second Year 

M 221 Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. M 222 Diff. & Integ. Calculus .. 3 s.h. 

PH 211 Engr. Physics (with lab) 4 s.h. PH 212 Engr. Physics (with lab) 4 sJi. 

MT 119 Engineering Materials .. 3 s.h. EM 124 Mechanical Processes .... 3 sh. 

Third Year 

M 323 Adv. Math for Engr. I .. 3 s.h. M 324 Adv. Math for Engr II 3 s.h. 

EM 221 Mechanics— Statics 3 sJi. EM 322 Mechanics— Dynamics .. 3 sJi. 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. E 202 Humanities 3 sJi. 

Fourth Year 

IE 114 Management Survey 3 s.h. EE 222 Elem. Elec. Engr 3 sJi. 

PH 331 Thermodynamics 3 s.h. PH 332 Thermodynamics 3 sJi. 

EM 333 Mechanisms 3 s.h. E 220 Tech. Report Writing.. 3 sJi. 

Fifth Year 
CH 201 Engr. Chemistry (with CH 202 Engr. Chem. (with lab) 4 s.h. 

lab) 4 s.h. EE 236 Industrial Electronics .... 3 sJi. 

EM 405 Fluid Mechanics 3 s.h. EM 416 Heat Transfer 3 ah. 

P 111 Psychology 3 sh. 

Sixth Year 

EC 133 Economics 3 s.h. EC 204 Engineering Economics 3 sJi. 

PS 223 Personnel Admin. 3 s.h. EM 234 Strength of Materials .... 3 sJi. 

Social Studies Elective SS 113 or Social Studies Elective SS 114 or 

SS 121 3 s.h. SS 122 3 sJi. 

Seventh Year 

IE 241 Methods & Motion IE 342 Work Measurements .... 3 sJi. 

Study 3 s.h. IE 134 Production Control 3 sJi. 

IE 133 Cost Control 3 s.h. Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Eighth Year 

IE 443 Factory Planning 3 sJi. IE 422 Analytical Methods . 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Restricted Electives totaling 12 semester hours are to be selected from the following areas: 

Drawing and Design, Engineering, Industrial Management or Personnel Supervision. 

Total Required for Degree 142 sem. hrs. 

* Entrance to these courses permitted upon satisfactory performance on the placement 
examinations. 



54 



New Haven College 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING— METALLURGICAL OPTION 

(Bachelor of Science) 

The Industrial Engineering-Metallurgical Option program combines 
basic metallurgical engineering with study in the field of industrial engin- 
eering. 

In order to acquire the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering- 
Metallurgical Option, all students must take a pattern of required courses. 
The successful completion of the required courses earns the student 133 
hours of the 142 semester hours of credit required for the degree. The re- 
maining nine hours of credit are selected from restricted electives in the 
fields of study indicated below. 
Required courses, totaling 133 sem. hrs. 



•M 113 

D 111 

»E 113 



Fall 
Trigonometry 

Engineering Drawing 
English Composition . 



First Year 



3 s.h. 'M 114 

3 s.h. 

3 s.h. D 112 

E 114 



Spring 

Algebra & Analytic 
Geometry 

Engineering Dwg. & 
Desc. Geom 

Speech 



3 s.h. 

3 s.h. 
3 s.h. 



Second Year 

Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. M 222 

Engr. Physics (with lab) 4 s.h 



M 221 

PH 211 

E 201 Humanities 3 s.h. 



PH 212 
E 202 



M 323 
CH 201 
MT 119 



IE 114 
EM 221 
PH 315 



EC 133 
PH 331 
P 111 



IE 133 
PS 223 
SS 113 
or 121 

IE 241 



Third Year 

Adv. Math for Engr. I 3 s.h. MT 220 

Engr. Chem. (with lab) 4 s.h. CH 202 

Engineering Materials .. 3 s.h. EM 124 

Fourth Year 

Management Survey 3 s.h. EE 222 

Mechanics-Statics 3 s.h. EM 322 

Nuclear Physics 3 s.h. E 220 

Fifth Year 

Economics 3 s.h. EC 204 

Thermodynamics 3 s.h. PH 332 

Psychology 3 s.h. MT 224 



Sixth Year 



Cost Control 3 s.h. 

Personnel Admin 3 s.h. 

Social Studies Elective.. 3 s.h. 



IE 134 
EE 236 
SS 114 
or 122 



Diff. & Integral Calculus 3 s.h. 
Engr. Physics (with lab) 4 s.h. 
Humanities 3 sJi. 



Metallography 3 s.h. 

Engr. Chem. (with lab) 4 s.h. 
Mechanical Processes .... 3 s.h. 



Elem. of Elec. Engr 3 s.h. 

Mechanics— Dynamics .... 3 s.h. 
Tech. Report Writing .. 3 sJi. 

Engineering Economics 3 s.h. 

Thermodynamics 3 s.h. 

Nuclear Metallurgy 3 s.h. 

Production Control 3 s.h. 

Industrial Electronics .. 3 s.h. 
Social Studies Elective .. 3 s.h. 



Seventh Year 

IE 342 



Methods and Motion 

Studies 3 s.h. 

Non Ferrous Metallurgy 

or 
Steel & Their Heat 

Treatment 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Eighth Year 
IE 443 Factory Planning 3 s.h. IE 422 



MT 331 
MT 341 



EM 234 
MT 332 

MT 341 



Work Measurements 3 s.h. 

Strength of Materials .... 3 s.h. 
Non Ferrous Metallurgy 

or 
Steel & Their Heat 
Treatment 3 sJi. 



Analytical Methods 3 s.h. 

Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 



Restricted Elective 3 s.h. 

Restricted Electives totaling 9 semester hours are to be selected from the following areas: 

Drawing and Design, Engineering, Industrial Management or Personnel Supervision. 

Total Required for Degree 142 sem. hrs. 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

offered in the 

EVENING CREDIT PROGRAM 



New Haven College, I960- 1961 



Description of Courses 



Courses bearing hyphenated numbers, for example, All 1-1 12, are two semesters in 
length, and the first semester is prerequisite to the second. Unless otherwise noted, they 
may be entered only in the Fall Semester. 

Courses bearing single numbers, for example, L 221 are only one semester in length. 

Courses designated by letter rather than by number are not of college grade, although 
they involve class and preparation time equivalent to other courses. 

Courses of the 100 level have no prerequisites: 200 level courses have one prerequisite: 
300-level have two prerequisites; 400-level courses have three or more prerequisites, or are 
to be taken in the final two years of a bachelor of science program. 

Accounting 

All 1-1 12. Introductory Accounting. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

This course, which is prerequisite to all other courses in accounting, familiarizes the 
student with fundamental principles of accounting. This work is supplemented by progress 
tests, problems, and systematic practice work. The fields of study covered include: inter- 
pretation of assets, liabilities, and net worth; preparation of statements; books of original 
entry; ledgers; and work at the end of a fiscal period. 

(OflEered also in Spring Semester on a two nights per week basis.) 

All 3. Industrial Accounting. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

(This course cannot be taken by accounting and business administration majors.) 

This is a basic course designed to acquaint engineering students with the vocabulary 
of accounting, the accounting cycle and the presentation of accounting statements. 

—Fall only. 

A221-A222. Irttermediate Accounting. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: All 1-1 12 

This course is a continuation at a more advanced level of the principles studied in 
Introductory Accounting. It is intensive and adapted to present-day changes in the ac- 
counting profession. The subject matter includes: the corporation, asset valuations, liabili- 
ties, installment sales and consignments, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, 
sources and application of funds, depreciation methods, inventory evaluation, reserves, 
and surplus analysis. There is considerable practice in the form of problem solutions. 
Reference is made to the publications of the professional accounting societies. 

A223-224. Cost Accounting. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Alll-112 

Offered in September of EVEN years. Offered in September of ODD years at Quin- 
nipiac College. 

This course embraces the study of departmental and process cost accounting, specific 
order cost accounting, and standard costs. Thorough consideration is given to cost elements 
of material, labor, and manufacturing expense. Also included is the study of cost estimat- 
ing, budgets in cost control, cost relationships, and cost reports for use of management. 
Forms and methods used in standard costs and analyses of variances for operational use 
are considered. Practical application of the principles studied is given through the work- 
ing of practice sets and problems. 

A 331-332. Advanced Accounting. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 221-222. 

This is the final general accounting course covering all phases of accounting not pre- 
viously covered and not considered of a specialized nature. This course is given in two 
sections, neither section being dependent upon the other. Upon completion of these sec- 

56 



Evening Credit Program 57 

tions, the student is prepared for advanced study in specialized accounting and C.PA. 
problems. 

A 333-334. Auditing. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 221-222, may be taken concurrently. 

Offered in September of ODD years. Offered in September of EVEN years at Quin- 
nipiac College. 

This course includes examination of the financial condition, review of operations, 
preparation of audit program, audit working papers, and report upon examination of the 
client's business. The accountant's relationship with the client and the ethics of the pro- 
fession are thoroughly discussed. A complete laboratory test is worked out to supplement 
the test study. Recent developments in audit procedure are included, systems in internal 
check analyzed, comparisons of balance sheets and detailed audits made. A background is 
developed in the theory of auditing in preparation for the C.P.A. examination. 

A 335-336. Income Tax Procedure. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 221-222 recommended, A 111-112 required. 

This course embraces a practical application of the principles of Federal Income Tax 
Law to concrete situations. The problems include the preparation of corporation, fiduciary, 
partnership, and individual tax returns; claims for refunds, credit, and abatement; records, 
reports, and requirements of Social Security and state and federal unemployment taxes; 
and the proper accounting procedure for tax records. 

A 443. Accounting Systems I. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 332, A 223. 

This course deals with the principles and practices applied in developing accounting 
systems. Such topics are covered as the preliminary survey; principles of internal check; 
systems for handling cash, receivables, purchases, sales and payrolls; special journals, 
ledgers, and statements. —Fall only. 

A 444. Accounting Systems II. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 443. 

A continuation of Accounting Systems I in which the principles studied are observed 
and analyzed through field trips to businesses and institutions which can best demonstrate 
the various types of accounting systems. The student is taught how to develop and adapt 
accounting systems according to the needs of different operations. —Spring only. 

Business Administration 

BA 101-102. Law of Contracts and Business Associations. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

This course involves a study of basic principles of the law of contracts, agency, part- 
nerships, limited partnerships, and corporations. 

Contracts will involve a study of the formation of contracts, capacity of parties, offer 
and acceptance, performance, and discharge. Agency will deal with the appointment of 
agents, the relationship of principal and agent, power of the agent to bind his principal, 
duties of agent and principal to one another and to third parties. 

Business associations will involve a study of the law relating to the formation and 
operation of the usual types of business organization. Also considered is the legal relation- 
ship among the individuals within the business organization as well as their relationship 
with third parties. 

BA 111. Principles of Selling. Credit, 3 senrester hours. 

This course presents definite techniques and basic principles of selUng and how to 
get along with people. It includes the study of: prospect selection, knowledge of the 
product, pre-approach and approach, demonstration, meeting objections, close and de- 
parture. Desirable personality traits of the salesman are considered. Each student will have 
opportunities to demonstrate his ability to sell a given product by means of a class demon- 
stration. —Fall only. 



58 New Haven College 

BA 112. Principles of Marketing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the fundamental principles of the flow of goods and services from producer 
to consumer. Buying, selling, transportation, storage, grading, risk-taking, financing, and 
supplying market information are all reviewed to determine their importance in the 
marketing and economic structure. —Spring only. 

BA 113. Business Finance. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: A 111, or EC 133, or A 113. 

After a brief study of the various forms of business organization, the corporate form 
of organization is studied in greater detail. Classes of stocks and bonds and the rights of 
the holder are considered. Management and distribution of income are examined in detail 
with regard to surplus and dividend policies, reserves, depreciation, and financing of ex- 
pansion. Stress is placed on the internal control of finances through budgets and organiza- 
tion as well as financing through banks and investment houses. —Fall only. 

BA 118. Business Mathematics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of fundamental mathematical processes and their application in business. 
Some of the subjects included are percentage, proportion, interest, discount, annuities, 
mark-up and margins, logarithms, the use of the slide rule, and an introduction to statisti- 
cal methods. -Spring only. 

BA 119. Office Organization and Management. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course considers the profession of office supervision and management by a study 
of the qualifications, responsibilities, and functions of the office manager. It deals with 
the organization of an office with respect to its personnel, physical layout, and equipment. 
The various departments of an office, such as filing, stenographic, credit, are analyzed. 
The place and function of the office in the whole organization of the business is studied. 
Attention is given to costs and budgets. —Fall only. 

BA 131. Public Relations. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course deals with the main principles of public relations, and how they are ap- 
plied in specific cases. It shows how the practice of public relations is used by individuals, 
groups, companies and organizations to gain public understanding and acceptance, and to 
improve their relations with everyone in a position to affect their welfare. One of the 
course requirements is a paper evaluating a public relations program. —Fall only. 

BA 211. Advertising. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course deals with the basic principles and applications of advertising. Topics 
covered include: the advertising agency and its place in modern business society, its re- 
lation to the marketing process, preparation of advertisements, choice of media, testing 
and research, layouts, "planning the campaign", consumer testing, product tryouts, etc. 

—Fall only. 

BA 216. Business Statistics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite. BA 118. 

A course offering a sound foundation in statistical methods as applied in business, 
government, institutional, and research organizations, as well as in personal use. Major 
topics include the planning of investigations, sampling, sources and the collection of data, 
tabulation, ratios, graphs, frequency distribution, measures of central tendency and dis- 
persion, index numbers, time series, seasonal and cyclical movements, trends, correlation, 
the normal curve, and the statistical report. Practical problems are used to emphasize and 
impress the textual materials. —Spring only. 

BA 221 . Lav\r of Sales. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: BA 101-102. 
Offered in September of ODD years. 

This course is an advanced study of Business Law comprising: bailments; duties and 
liabilities of bailees, common carriers, and warehousemen; the laws governing the rights 
of parties engaged in the transfer of personal property. Questions of title, risks assumed, 
rights of creditors, express and implied warranties, buyers' and sellers' remedies, together 
with the business background out of which such relations arise are also considered. 

—Fall only. 



Evening Credit Program 59 

BA 222. Law of Commercial Paper and Bankruptcy. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: BA 101-102. 

Offered in February of EVEN years. 

This course is a study of the Negotiable Instruments Law, dealing with negotiable 
promissory notes, bills of exchange and bank checks with an analysis of their form and 
function in commercial transactions. A brief survey of bankruptcy procedure under the 
federal bankruptcy laws is considered. —Spring only. 

BA 342. Market Research. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: BA 111, BA 112, BA 216. 

The focus of this course is on the use of qualitative and quantitative analysis of the 
markets in which business operates. 

The following problems will be considered: sales analysis, advertising research, prod- 
uct planning and analysis, sources of data and methods of their collection, sampling 
techniques, methods of tabulation and analysis, methods of organizing and conducting 
marketing research, budget considerations, etc., outside readings and term reports. 

—Spring only. 

Chemistry 

CH 201-202. Engineering Chemistry. Credit, 8 semester hours, with laboratory. 

Prerequisite: PH 211-212. 

Presents a systematic study of the fundamental principles of chemistry and the chemi- 
cal reactions of the elements and their compounds together with application chosen for 
their theoretical and industrial importance and also for their value in providing a basis 
for subsequent technical courses. 

Laboratory and Breakage Fee: $12.50 per semester. 

Drawing and Design 

D 111. Engineering Drawing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This is an elementary course in engineering drawing designed to teach the use of 
instruments, the fundamental principles of projection, drafting room standards and con- 
ventions, lettering, selection and use of scales, orthographic projections, revolutions, de- 
veloped surfaces, intersections and auxiliary views, and the making and dimensioning of 
complete working drawings of simple machine parts. 

112. Drawing and Descriptive Geometry. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: D 111 or equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Engineering Drawing but includes the basic principles 
of space relationships with emphasis on the solution of engineering problems. Principal 
views; auxiliary views, oblique views, line and plane problems, revolution, surfaces and 
developments, surfaces and intersections, and warped surfaces, are studied. 

D 333-334. Machine Design. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: D 111-112 and EM 124. 

Offered in September of EVEN years. 

The first semester of this course consists of a study of the elements of design. The 
second semester considers the analysis and design of such elements as fastenings, bearings, 
gears, shafts, clutches, pulleys, and cams. Some machine parts are studied from the stand- 
point of kinematics, and their motions are analyzed. 

D 335-336. Tool Design. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites. D 111-112 and EM 124. 

Offered in September of ODD years. 

The objective of this course is to present and develop the basic techniques of tool 
design through lectures, class discussions, and student design problems. Major topics con- 
sidered are: methods analysis, drill jig design, tolerances and allowances, cutting tools. 



60 New Haven College 

die design, gages and gaging policies, milling fixtures, turret lathe tooling, and cam de- 
signs for automatic screw machines. 

D 441-442. Advanced Machine Design. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites. D 333-334, EM 221 and EM 234. 

Offered in September of ODD years. 

Following a review of the elements of machine design studied in the first year, com- 
plete designs are individually selected and developed by the student. Advanced problems, 
such as balancing and critical speeds, are considered the latter part of the year. 

D 445-446. Tool Engineering. Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites. D 335-336, EM 221 and EM 234. 

Offered in September of EVEN years. 

This course will consider the interrelationships of tool design with the pertinent ele- 
ments of tool engineering such as: planning, processing, estimating, and tooling costs. 
Student tool design work will be of a group nature entailing the complete planning and 
designing necessary to manufacture machine parts and die work. Major topics considered 
are: locating and clamping theory, tooling economics, tool estimating, and process plan- 
ning. 

Economics 

EC 133. Economics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The course aims at an understanding of the principles, institutions, and practices 
which form the basis of our economic system and activity. Such aspects of our economy 
as production, price, exchange, and distribution will be considered. The course examines 
the basic economic aspects of capitalism and the other "isms". Opportunity is offered to 
the student to do independent work in the field of his own specialized interest. 

—Fall only. 
EC 202. Economic History of the United States. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EC 133. 

The development of American economic life in the various stages of agriculture, trade, 
industry, finance, and labor. The change of economic practices and institutions particu- 
larly in the realms of business, banking, and labor is stressed as well as the changing role 
of government. —Spring only. 

EC 204. Engineering Economics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EC 133. 

A quantitative analysis of applied economics in engineering practice; the economy 
study for comparing alternatives; interest formulas; quantitative methods of comparing 
alternatives; intangible considerations; selection and replacement economy for machines 
and structures; break-even and minimum cost points; depreciation; relationship of ac- 
counting to the economy study; review of current industrial practices. Aims to promote 
logical decisions from the consideration of alternative courses of action. —Spring only. 

EC 236. Money and Banl<ing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133, and EC 202 or EC 204. 

The paper, silver and gold standards for our currency are reviewed; why the gold 
bullion standard was adopted; economic importance of the commercial and other types of 
banks; the development of commercial banking policies since 1920; the rise of consumer 
credit; the Federal Reserve System as a regulator of banking and as an aid to Federal 
Financing. -Spring only. 

EC 442. Economic Thought. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EC 133, EC 202. 

This course describes the development of economic doctrine from mercantilism and 
Adam Smith to the thinking of modem-day theorists. The emphasis is placed upon the 
main currents of thought with the apphcability to present-day problems. Individual 
study and reporting are stressed during the semester. —Spring only. 



Evening Credit Program 61 

Electrical Engineering 

EE 222. Elements of Electrical Engineering. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course cannot be taken for credit by electrical engineering students who have 
passed EE 224. 

Prerequisites: M 114, PH 212. 

The fundamental concepts of electricity and magnetism and their application to 
electrical circuiting and electromagnetic devices are considered. Electrical measuring tech- 
niques and industrial applications of electrical machinery are also pointed out. Problems 
involving simple mathematics accompany such class assignments. —Spring only. 

EE 223-224. Principles of Electrical Engineering. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 212, M 221-222. 

This course consists of the fundamental concepts of electricity. It includes Ohm's law 
and Kirchoff's laws, a study of the properties of conductors and insulators, nonlinear re- 
sistance circuits, magnetic circuits and fields, induced and generated electromotive force, 
and the dielectric circuit. A brief survey is made of the a-c circuits, d-c and a-c machines 
and electronic tubes and circuits. 

EE 233. Basic Electronics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222 or EE 224. 

This course includes a study of thermionic emission, various tube types and charac- 
teristics, methods of analyzing vacuum tubes and vacuum tube circuits, analysis and 
design of small signal and large signal amplifier circuits, gas tubes, rectifiers and filters. 

—Fall only. 

EE 235. Direct Current Machines. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222 or EE 223 (EE 223 may be taken concurrently.) 
This course includes a review of the fundamental laws of direct current circuits and 
magnetic circuits; mechanical construction of the d-c machine; magnetic circuits of d-c 
machines, flux leakage, armature and field windings; electromotive and magnetomotive 
forces of the armature, armature reaction; commutation; generator and motor charac- 
teristics; special machines, such as dynamotor, servomotors, Ward-Leonard motorgenerator, 
rototrol generator, Rosenberg generator (amplidyne), multistage rototrol; starting of 
d-c motors (manual and automatic starters). Laboratory work is also included. 

—Fall only. 

EE 236. Industrial Electronics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222 or EE 224 or EE 233. 

Analysis and design of the electronic components used in industrial processes; per- 
formance tests on selected electronic apparatus such as power rectifiers, photoelectric 
controls, magnetic amplifiers, motor controls, voltage regulators, radio frequency heating 
equipment, resistance welding controls, and introduction to feedback control systems. 

—Spring only. 

EE 242. Alternating Current Machines. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222 or EE 223. 

The basic theory of AC circuits and DC machines is combined with electromagnetics 
in a study of basic AC machinery. Single phase, poly-phase and auto transformers, poly- 
phase alternators, induction motors and two phase servomotors, paralleling alternators 
and single phase-motors of various types are covered. Application of the various devices 
are considered. Laboratory work in this equipment supplements the lectures. 

—Spring only. 

EE 252. Illumination. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222 or EE 223. 

Offered in February of ODD years. 

This course includes a study of the design of lighting systems for best seeing and 
a maximum efficiency. Photometric units and measurements, properties of the eye, char- 
acteristics of lamps and luminaires, daylight and fluorescence. —Spring only. 



62 New Haven College 

EE 331-332. Alternating Current Circuits. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 223-224 and M 323 (M 323 may be taken concurrently.) 
This course covers the fundamental theory of single phase and poly-phase alternating 
current circuits, instruments and measurements. The concepts of vector algebra and 
Fourier analysis are applied to steady-state solutions of AC networks, and differential 
equations are applied to the transient analysis of circuit elements. 

EE 347-348. Electronic Engineering. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 331-332 and M 323 (M 323 may be taken concurrently). 

This course is largely concerned with the discussion of basic circuits making up 
more complex electronic devices. A large part of the course is assigned to the analysis of 
apparatus used in practice, both in industry and communications. Magnetic, audio and 
servo amplifiers as well as high-frequency systems will be analyzed during the second 
semester. 

EE 437. Electric Power Transmission. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 331-332. 

Offered in September of EVEN years. 

This course considers the economics of power systems as well as generating equip- 
ment, metering, switching and protective devices, types of transformers and transformer 
connections, transmission line calculations, system protection and distribution systems. 

—Fall only. 

EE 441-442. Electronic Computers. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 347-348 and M 323-324. 

This course includes a study of the systems for solving complex mathematical problems 
by electronic techniques; the fundamental properties of differential analyzers, analog and 
digital computers with particular emphasis on the logical structure of components (such 
as adders, multipliers, counters, registers, etc.) and the interrelations necessary for fully 
automatic operations. Laboratory work is also included. 

EE 445-446. Communications Circuits. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 347-348 and M 323. 

Offered in September of EVEN years. 

This course includes the analysis of communication circuits and the design of the 
components of communication systems, performance testing of receivers, transmitters, 
power amplifiers and other elements of telephone, carrier current, telemetering, radio, 
television, remote control and speech amplifying systems. 

EE 450. Transistor Electronics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 331-332. 

This course includes the theory of semi-conductors, and the properties of semi- 
conductor devices; characteristics of point contact and junction transistors; the four- 
terminal networks, equivalent circuits, stability, power gain and cascading problems. Low 
frequency amplifiers. High frequency circuits, high frequency amplifiers. Application of 
semi-conductor devices in amplifiers, oscillators, magnetic amplifiers and computers. 

—Fall only. 

EE 451-452. Network Analysis. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EE 331-332 and M 323-324. 

Offered in September of ODD years. 

This course includes the formulation of the basic notions in network theory, with 
emphasis on the n-pole. General techniques of circuit analysis and their application to the 
analysis of vacuum tube, transistor, and other types of circuits. Standard modes of char- 
acterization of n-terminal-pair networks and an analysis of the basic properties of various 
types of network functions. Synthesis of passive and active networks including synthesis of 
two-poles by the Brune and Bott-Duffin methods; synthesis of four-poles, synthesis of RC 
networks; time domain methods. 



Evening Credit Program 65 

EE 455-456. Servomechanisms and Feedback Control Systems. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 323 and EE 348 or EE 446 or EE 452. 

Offered in September of EVEN years. 

This course includes the differential equations of dynamical systems, analogues, linear- 
ization techniques, block diagram representation, concept of transfer function, classical 
servomechanisms, transient analysis and synthesis, frequency spectrum analysis and syn- 
thesis, stability criteria, transfer loci, compensation methods, use of inverse plane. Bode 
plot, straight line approximations, gain-phase relationships, Nyquist plots and root-locus 
technique. Correlation between root-locus and frequency loci, compensation using root- 
locus, multiple loop systems, block diagram reduction techniques, multipole systems, and 
the use of describing function for linearization. 

Mechanical Engineering 

EM 124. Mechanical Processes. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic metal cutting processes. 
Machining properties of metals are developed both with respect to single and multiple 
point metal cutting tools as well as the adaptability of standard and special machine tools 
employed by the metal industry. The lathe, milling machine, planer, shaper, saw and 
other allied machine tools where metal is removed by chip formation are specifically 
covered. Simultaneously, the selection and application of basic cutting tool materials is 
developed for each basic machine. The approach is planned to enable the engineer to 
choose or substitute several basic machine tools for specific applications. —Spring only, 

EM 221. Mechanics — Statics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M 221-222 and PH 211. 

This course includes the theory and application of the principles of static equilibrium, 
stress in framed structures, friction, center of gravity, and moments of inertia. 

—Fall only. 

EM 234. Strength of Materials. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: EM 221. 

This course considers the theory of stress and resistance of materials; stress distribu- 
tion and riveted joints, shafts, beams, and columns; and principal stresses. —Spring only. 

EM 322. Mechanics — Dynamics. 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EM 221 and M 221-222. 

A study is made of the application of the principles of dynamics to the analysis of 
special topics in machines, such as the effect of inertia, flywheel design, balancing, gover- 
nors, and gyroscopic effects. An introduction to vibration and critical speeds is presented. 

—Spring only. 
EM 333. Mechanisms (Kinematics). Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EM 221 and M 221-222. 

Offered in September of ODD years. 

Linkages comprising mechanisms are studied as well as the graphical analysis of 
displacements, velocities and acceleration in mechanisms, including the use of instantan- 
eous centers. Design of cams is considered, and an analysis is made of belt drives, gear 
profile action, and gear trains. —Fall only. 

EM 405. Fluid Mechanics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EM 322. 

Fundamentals, fluid statics, viscosity, flow of an ideal fluid, flow of a real fluid, 
dimensional analysis, measuring devices, flow in pipes, open channel flow, dynamic action 
of fluids, and centrifugal pumps. —Fall only. 

EM 416. Heat Transfer. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: EM 405 and PH 331-332. 

Conduction, convection, and radiation as different types of heat transfer. Steady- and 
unsteady-state conduction problems in solids. Solutions will be developed by analytical, 
numerical, and graphical methods. Dimensional analysis of convection problems; analogy 
between heat transfer and fluid friction. Heat transfer in tubes and on external surfaces. 
Combined conduction and convection effects. Heat exchangers and cooling fins. 

—Spring only. 



64 New Haven College 

English 

E A. Basic Grammar. One semester. No credit. . _:„„^^ ,„ tho iie»» of 

upon which good English is based; second, to give hira practical experience in "»e use or 
themes, recitations, notebooks, and conferences; and to train him m the use ot tne aic- 
tionary. Special work is prescribed for those whose preparation is inadequate ana ror 
those who show need of review. -Either Fall or Spring. 

E B. Reading Laboratory. One semester. No credit. Tuition $60.00 

This course aims at helping the student to read faster and to increase comprehension 
The objectives are more effective study habits, increased vocabulary, the enjoyment ot 
reading and the development of independent thinking. The subject matter includes methods 
and mechanics of reading, use of the dictionary, values in words, patterns of writing, the 
outline, rationality of argument, propaganda, and literary values. The work of the course 
includes reading and exercises in the text, vocabulary exercises, supervised reading for 
speed, training films and discussion. —Either Fall or Spring. 

E 113. English Composition. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on English Placement Examination, either at 
admission or at the completion of EA Basic Grammar. 

This course is designed primarily to help students learn to write by writing— to de- 
velop the ability to organize thoughts quickly and effectively, to write with speed and 
facility, and to use simple written English. -Either Fall or Spring. 

E 114. Speech. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of speech. The objectives are: 
to develop in the student proficiency in the use of vocal and bodily aids in various speak- 
ing situations, and to help the student gain confidence and fluency when speaking ex- 
temporaneously, as in group discussions, or in everyday conversation. Recordings are used 
for self-analysis and criticism. —Either Fall or Spring. 

E 118. Modern Literature. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a general understanding of the various kinds 
of literature being written today and to acquaint him with representative samples of recent 
fiction, biography, essays, poetry, and drama. The reading and classroom discussion will be 
supplemented by lectures which will attempt to provide certain theories of criticism and 
to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciaion of literature. —Spring only. 

E 201-202. Humanities. Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: E 113. 

An approach to man's perennial search to find meaning for his place in the universe 
and perspective for his systems of knowledge. Dealing with selected intellectual, ethical 
and aesthetic problems, the student is introduced to some classics in literature, history, 
philosophy and art which provide the foundations of contemporary culture. Extensive 
reading in primary sources is expected. 

E 220. Technical Report Writing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: E 113 

Included in this course of writing for the engineering, management and business stu- 
dent is the study and analysis of the professional scientific paper, the preparation of re- 
ports on the technical and semi- technical level and an introduction to the principles of 
business letter writing. Emphasis is placed on the study and writing of the internal plant 
memorandum and report. —Either Fall or Spring. 

Industrial Engineering 

IE 114. Management Survey. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This is an introductory course in management. It introduces the student to all the 
major functions of industry, their interrelationship, and how they are brought together 
through organization. Thus the student receives instruction in the preliminaries of 
methods, cost, production control, product development, finance, physical facilities, quality 
control, plant engineering, industrial relations, job evaluation, sales, advertising, budgets, 
and records. —Either Fall or Spring. 



Evening Credit Program 65 

IE 119. Industrial Safety and Hygiene. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This is a basic course in industrial accident prevention and industrial hygiene, and 
covers: managerial accident prevention, functions and responsibilities; injury data de- 
velopment, usage, and validity; machine guarding techniques and guard development, 
including point-of-operation, drives; personal protective equipment; fire prevention and 
control, including flammable solvents, dusts and their characteristics; electrical hazards; 
hand tools, power and manual; employee training; communications; hazard analysis; 
accident investigation. Industrial hygiene problems caused by solvents, dusts, noise, radia- 
tion are studied as well as bodies, laws and catastrophe hazards. —Fall only. 

IE 1 33. Cost Control. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: A 112 recommended. 

A large percentage of the cost of a product is incurred by the supervisors and fore- 
men through whose departments the product passes on its way from raw material to finish- 
ed state. To control and reduce this cost is an important part of their job. Only if they 
understand all the factors comprising such costs can they accomplish this end. This course 
will familiarize them with the elements of cost necessary to control, stressing particularly 
the indirect or overhead elements— their measurement and control. —Fall only. 

IE 134. Production Control. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The instruction stresses the basic principles that govern production control in an in- 
dustrial plant. These principles are worked out in the problems of procuring and con- 
trolling materials, in routing, scheduling, and dispatching. The intent of the course is to 
familiarize the student with the use of the most up-to-date methods in this field, includ- 
ing visual control systems. —Spring only. 

IE 241. Methods and Motion Study. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 114. 

The first half of the course presents the techniques of process and motion analysis 
and the principles of motion economy. These are demonstrated from applications drawn 
from an extensive film library. The second half comprises intensive work in the laboratory. 
Practical problems from shops and offices are analyzed for improvement. Motion pictures 
are taken of the improved jobs and these pictures are then subjected to a micromotion 
analysis. By this means the student becomes motion conscious and better able to apply 
correct principles of motion to jobs, through his ability to visualize motion sequences. 

—Fall only. 

IE 342. Worl< Measurements. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 241. 

A basic time study course. Job breakdown into elements. Use of stop watch and other 
timing devices. Analysis of recorded data, application of normalizing and fatigue factors 
Computation of standard times. The setting of synthetic time standards from standard 
data and the use of charts and curves to simplify applications are demonstrated. Uses of 
standard data for improvement of methods, tools, fixtures, and machines, and for cost 
control. Time studies are made on a variety of hand and machine operations performed in 
the laboratory. Facility in rating of time studies is aided by concentrated rating sessions 
utilizing films. —Spring only. 

IE 422. Analytical Methods in Industrial Engineering. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Offered in Spring ot EVEN years. 
Prerequisite: M 323. 

Applications of modern algebraic methods in industrial practice. Topics covered in- 
clude game theory, mathematical programming, and statistical methods. 

IE 435. Statistical Methods (with Lab.) Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 323. 

This course consists of lecture and laboratory work and an introduction to the ap- 
plication of statistical techniques to industrial and engineering problems, probability and 
distribution theory, measures of central tendency and dispersion in relation to population 
and samples: statistical inference problems classified in terms of (1) estimation procedures, 
(2) tests of hypotheses, and (3) confidence intervals: differentiation of Type I and Type II 
errors and their significance for problems of statistical inference. 



66 New Haven College 

IE 436. Quolity Control. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Offered in Spring of EVEN years. 

Prerequisite: IE 435. 

This course studies economics of quality control; modem methods used by industry 
to achieve quality of product; preventing defects; organizing for quality; locating chronic 
sources of trouble; co-ordinating specifications, manufacturing, and inspection; measuring 
process capability using inspection data to regulate manufacturing processes; control 
charts; selection of modem sampling plans. 

IE 443. Factory Planning. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 342. 

Factors in plant location, design and layout of equipment. The basic principles of 
obtaining information essential for carrying out such investigations. This is a survey course 
which also covers briefly such practices as material handling, storage and storeroom, 
maintenance, and service departments in modern factories. —Fall only. 

IE 501 . Data Processing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 346d or IE 435. 

This course is an introduction to the new field of business computers and is de- 
signed to give a broad view of magnetic storage machines and the stored program 
concept. Class will study operational features of a number of types and laboratory work 
in programming and program testing will be performed on a late model, medium size 
business computer, through in-plant visitations. 

IE 502. Operations Research. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prequisite: IE 422. 

This course covers the application of mathematical and statistical techniques to 
problems of industrial organizations. The work will build on the earlier courses in math- 
ematics and quantitative controls. Problems are drawn from the various functional areas 
of industry and from the social sciences. 



Mathematics 

M A-B. Basic Mathematics I. No credit. Meets 2 nights a week per semester. 

This course in mathematical methods represents the fundamental operations of algebra 
and the application of these operations to problems. Topics discussed include the theory 
of equations, factoring, and fractions. In geometry the concept of proof is emphasized and 
applied, and the properties of the triangle are considered. —Either Fall or Spring, 

M C-D. Basic Mathematics II. No credit. Meets 2 nights a week per semester. 

Prerequisite: M A-B or equivalent. 

The study of algebra is continued in this course and includes the following subjects: 
the quadratic equation, ratio and proportion, variation, and the trigonometry of the right 
triangle. In geometry the circle is discussed and studied, and consideration is given to 
similar figures and areas. —Either Fall or Spring. 

M 113. Trigonometry. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M C-D or equivalent. 

This course is devoted entirely to the study of trigonometry. The topics studied in- 
clude trigonometric functions, fundamental relations, solutions of right and oblique tri- 
angles, trigonometric reductions, angular measure, graphs of the functions, composite 
angles, inverse functions, logarithms and the use of the slide rule. 

M 114. Algebra and Analytic Geometry. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: M C-D or equivalent. 

The fundamental operations of algebra are thoroughly reviewed and various topics 
such as the function concept, variation, synthetic division, complex numbers and deter- 
minants are studied. Special emphasis is placed on the solution of word problems. The 
analytic geometry of the straight line, circle and parabola is studied in detail. 

—Spring only. 



Evening Credit Program 67 

M 221-222. Differential and Integral Calculus. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 113, M 114. 

In this course, the limit concept, the derivative and its applications to problerns in- 
volving maxima and minima are carefully studied. The differentiation and integration of 
the power function are studied concurrently and are applied to problems in physics and 
science. These include areas, volumes of revolution, centroids and moments of inertia of 
planes and solids of revolution, and differentials. The differentiation and integration of 
the trigonometric exponential, and logarithmic functions are carefully studied. The func- 
tions are then applied to problems. 

M 323. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers I. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 222. 

This course provides an opportunity for students to follow through to completion 
many of the topics introduced in Differential and Integral Calculus and to study the appli- 
cations of those topics. The course is further designed to provide a better mathematical 
background for the study of advanced engineering courses by including partial differen- 
tiation, multiple integration, infinite series and an introduction to ordinary differential 
equations. —Fall only. 

M 324. Advanced Mathematics for Engineers II. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 323. 

This course continues the study of some of the advanced mathematical techniques 
used in the solution of engineering problems. Included will be ordinary and partial differ- 
ential equations, Fourier series, vector analysis, an introduction to the functions of a 
complex variable by means of the Fourier integral and the Laplace transformation. 

—Spring only. 

Analytical Methods in Industrial Engineering (IE 422) see page 65. 
Business Mathematics (BA 117) see page 58. 

Metallurgy 

MT 119. Engineering Materials. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the principal metals used as engineering materials with concentration on 
the properties and applications of ferrous alloys. Attention is directed to the production 
of these materials, methods of fabrication and typical properties of the finished product. 
This course is designed to offer the student a complete coverage of the elements of physi- 
cal metallurgy. In general, the avenue of approach is designed to assist engineers who must 
select metals and alloys for engineering use. —Fall only. 

MT 220. Metallography. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 119. 

In this course the relations between equilibrium diagrams, heat diagrams, structures, 
and physical properties of both ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys are stressed. 
Attention is given to pyroraetric measurements, automatic temperature control apparatus, 
gas and electric heat-treating furnaces, and quenching methods and media, and preparation 
of metallurgical specimens for microscopic examination. —Spring only. 

MT 224. Nuclear Metallurgy. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: MT 119. (PH 315 recommended) 

The content of this course will include: 

General discussion of nuclear reactors, production and fabrication of uranium metal 
and alloys, metallurgy of zirconium, thorium, plutonium, beryllium, liquid metals used 
in nuclear reactors, fabrication of reactor components, non-destructive materials testing 
and the radiation damage of materials. —Spring only. 

MT 331-332. Non-ferrous Metallurgy. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 220. 

Offered in September of ODD years. 

The physical metallurgy of aluminum, magnesium, copper, nickel, zinc, lead, tin and 
their alloys is covered by lecture, discussion and laboratory work. Melting, alloying, cast- 
ing, extruding, rolling, drawing, and heat treatment of the metals are studied with em- 
phasis on the efforts of variables and reasons therefor. Typical mill and service difficulties 
are analyzed in light of the specific fundamental principles involved. 



68 New Haven College 

MT 341-342. Steels and Their Heat Treatment. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: MT 220. 

Offered in September of EVEN years. 

The course covers the principal grades of carbon and alloy steels employed for press, 
structural, automotive, tool and die as well as stainless applications. Cast irons are also 
included as competitive material. The fundamentals such as the iron-carbon phase dia- 
gram, transformation diagrams, grain size and hardenability are studied. 

Music 

MU 101. Music Appreciation. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course, intended primarily for students with no previous formal training in 
music, is designed to provide the foundations for intelligent and appreciative listening. 
Elements of musical form and style will be studied in relationship to their historical 
background. Actual recordings will be used to illustrate the lectures. Attendance at con- 
certs in New Haven, as well as other approved programs, may be required. 

Personnel Supervision 

PS 223. Personnel Administration. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: IE 114 and Pill. 

The aim of this course is to provide a foundation in fundamental concepts and a 
general knowledge of techniques in the administration of personnel relations. 

The course covers such subjects as the nature of personnel administration, the handling 
of personnel problems, employee attitudes and morale. Such techniques of personnel ad- 
ministration as recruitment, interviews, placement, training, employee rating as well as 
wage policies and administration are dealt with. In order to secure breadth and depth in 
the approach to personnel problems, simple case studies are used at appropriate points 
throughout the course. —Fall only. 

PS 225. Human Relations in Management. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 223. 

This course continues the study of human relations begun in PS 223 with accent upon 
the individual's relation to his co-worker. Basic psychological concepts such as motiva- 
tion, personality, morale, etc. establish the groundwork for discussion within the class of 
the case studies dealing with associates, subordinates and superiors. —Spring only. 

PS 242. Conference Leadership. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 223. 

This course is designed to accomplish two main objectives: (1) study in the principles 
and problems peculiar to conducting business conferences, training conferences, or union- 
management discussion and (2) practice in conference leadership. Original and creative 
work is required in the subject matter of the practice conferences. The student may meet 
this requirement by the completion of a research project in some area of his previous 
study, or by submitting adequate conference plans based upon practical experience and 
research on his job. —Spring only. 

PS 244. Management-Labor Relations. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PS 223. 

This course aims to present the problems involved in the relations of management and 
labor. It begins with a history of the labor movement, then considers the intervention of 
government in labor relations, and explains the legal framework within which plant 
practices evolve. The discussion of current practices in negotiation, in grievance handling, 
and in the settlement of disputes is designed to bring out a point (,; view which may con- 
tribute to a greater stability in relations. —Spring only. 



Evening Credit Program 69 

Philosophy 

PHIL. 111. Introduction to Problems of Philosophy. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introduction to reflective thinking on such central issues of human life as man's 

place in the universe, how we discover truth, the nature of beauty and the good, and the 
basis of moral choices. Ideas of a few major philosophers from Plato to Dewey will be 
presented. Stimulation of individual clear thinking upon life's most vital problems will 
be emphasized in discussion. —Fall of odd years. 

PHIL. 1 1 3. Introduction to the History of Philosophy. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Offered in September of EVEN years 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the student in the traditions of philosophic 
thought in the Western cultural heritage. 

A chronological development beginning with Pre-Socratic thinkers and coming down 
to Kant and Hegel is considered. The thoughts of individual men such as Aristotle, St. 
Thomas, Spinoza, Kant, and others are studied in their important aspects and related to 
surrounding circumstances. By this means, major philosophic attitudes are outlined. 

PHIL. 222. Ethics in a Changing Society. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PHIL. Ill or 113. 

Offered in February of ODD years 

A constructive appraisal of the major ethical systems in the framework of the prob- 
lems of contemporary society. Ethical norms which point to the goals and ends of life and 
their relation to the issues of science, business, the professions and other human activities 
are examined in problem studies. 

PHIL. 224. Logic and Scientific Method. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PHIL. Ill or PHIL. 113. 
Offered in February of EVEN years 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the formal rigors of deduc- 
tion, warranted induction, and scientific description, so far as they bear on the theory, 
application and limits of scientific method. 

Class procedure consists of developing the main problems in the logic science, pre- 
senting main points via examples, and discussion of applications. 

Physics 

PH 211-212. Engineering Physics. Credit, 8 semester hours. (With laboratory period each 

semester.) 

Prerequisites: M 113 and M 114. 

This is a basic course in physics for technical students with lectures and demonstra- 
tions. Attention is paid to the basic principles of physics including mechanics, motion, 
velocity, acceleration, electricity, heat. The course stresses use of the slide rule, applied 
mathematics and graphical methods of presentation and analysis. The course aims to 
develop the habit of using correct methods of thinking and analysis in the solution of 
engineering problems. Laboratory and Breakage Fee: $12-50 per semester. 

PH 315. Nuclear Physics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: PH 212 or equivalent. 

This course includes a survey of the developments in contemporary theories of atoms, 
molecules, matter and radiation; introduces the student to basic concepts necessary to the 
understanding of the properties of nuclear particles, natural and artificial radioactivity, 
nuclear disintegrations, cosmic rays, mesons and the application of nuclear phenomena to 
some practical problems. —Fall only. 

PH 331-332. Thermodynamics. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: PH 211-212, M 221-222. 

This course begins with a study of thermodynamics which covers the first and second 
laws of thermodynamics and their applications to general type problems. With this 
groundwork established, the course proceeds to deal with the various industrial applica- 
tions of this work such as: fans, blowers, pumps, flow systems, refrigeration, and air 
conditioning, and elements of steam power. 



70 New Haven College 

Psychology 

P m . General Psychology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a general knowledge of the important 
principles of human behavior. Topics included are: motivation, emotion, learning, per- 
sonality, intelligence, etc. The utilization of psychological knowledge in relation to every- 
day human activities will be emphasized. —Either Fall or Spring. 

Russian 

RU 101-102. Elementary Russian. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

An introduction to Russian stressing pronunciation, aural comprehension, and con- 
versation; instruction in the fundamental principles of grammar; training in reading 
comprehension. -Offered in Fall of Even Years. 

Science 

SC m -1 1 2. Modern Science. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

A survey of the methods of science and the place of physical science in our modem 
world. The material covered is taken from astronomy, physics, chemistry and geology, 
with the emphasis on the unity of physical science as a field of knowledge. The aim of 
the course is to develop a scientific attitude of mind and to provide a summary for the 
student of man's knowledge about the world in which he lives. 

Social Studies 

SS 113. Sociology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is a study of the role of culture in society; the person and personality; 
groups and group behavior; institutions; social interaction and social change. 

—Fall only. 

SS 114. Problems in Sociology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SS 113. 

From the principles covered in Sociology 113, the student studies the major problems 
which confront the present social order and the methods in practice and being considered 
for dealing with these problems. —Spring only. 

SS 121-122. Political Science. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

This course deals with the structure and functions of the national government, party 
organization, national and state relations, and American politics as compared to other 
countries and the trends in modern politics. 

In the second semester state and local governments are studied. 

Spanish 

SP 101-102. Elementary Spanish. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

An introduction to Spanish stressing pronunciation, aural comprehension, and basic 
conversation; instruction in the fundamental principles of grammar; training in reading 
comprehension. —Offered in Fall of Odd Years. 

SP 201-202. Intermediate Spanish. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: SP 101-102, or equivalent. 

A more advanced course for students with two years of high school Spanish or one 
year of college Spanish. Emphasis is on conversation, with advanced study of grammar 
and composition. Works of prominent Spanish -American authors will be read. 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 

The Daytime 
Cooperative Program 

OFFERING THE DEGREE 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 



New Haven College, I96O-I96I 



Calendar 



THE DAYTIME COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
1960-1961 

The Cooperative Program consists of alternate periods of study and 
work; therefore, the students are divided into two groups— Group A and 
Group B, 



Group A 

Period 1— Study 



1960 

Last day of application Aug. 12 

Registration Aug. 29 

Tuition due on or before Aug. 29 

Day classes begin Aug. 29 

* Evening classes begin Sept. 19 

Classes end Nov. 4 



Group B 

Period I— Cooperative Work 



1960 



Last day of application 
Registration Mon, Eve. 
Tuition due on or before 
* Evening classes begin 



Aug. 26 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 
Sept. 



10 
19 



Period 2— Cooperative Work 

Work period begins Nov. 7 

Work period ends Jan. 20, 1961 



Period 2— Study \f 



Classes begin Nov. 7 

Thanksgiving (holiday) Nov. 24-25 
Christmas Recess Dec. 24- 

Jan. 3, 1961 
Classes end Jan. 20, 1961 



Period 3— Study 



1961 



23 

23 

1 



Tuition due on or before Jan. 

Classes begin Jan. 

* Evening classes begin Feb. 
Washington's Birthday 

(holiday) Feb. 

Classes end March 30 

Good Friday (holiday) March 31 



Period 3— Cooperative Work 

1961 

Work period begins 



Tuition due on or before 
* Evening classes begin 



Jan. 23 
Jan. 25 
Feb. 1 



22 Work period ends March 30 



Period 4— Cooperative Work 

Work period begins Apr. 

Work period ends June 



Period 4— Study 

o Classes begin Apr. 3 

9 Memorial Day (holiday) May 30 

Classes end June 9 



* See Evening Credit program calendar for complete evening calendar. 

72 



The Daytime Cooperative Program 

Staff Member in Charge: C. L. Robertson 



Aims and Objectives 

The College realizes that work experience is a vital part of the learning 
experience, and provides in its program an opportunity for the student to 
explore various job situations. When a student is put into a work situation, 
he acquires knowledge that will supplement and complement his classroom 
learning. There is also the maturing influence of the opportunity to work 
with working people. As yet, there is no classroom substitute for the practical 
knowledge derived from experiences of the day-to-day problems on the job. 
The experience gained from the cooperative jobs— doing difiEerent types of 
work and discovering the working conditions on these jobs— assists the stu- 
dent in choosing a field for his life's work. 

Through the College's experience in coordinating the work and study 
of student-employees in its evening credit program, it recognizes the desir- 
ability of developing young men and women who will enter business or in- 
dustry with more than narrow technical skills. Many companies are looking 
for future leaders with a background broad enough to prepare them to cope 
with the increasingly complex economic and social problems of business 
today. The Cooperative Program of studies is designed to meet this need. 
Its curriculum provides subjects that develop the individual both intellec- 
tually and socially. It also provides the technical education necessary for 
entry jobs in business and industry. 

The Cooperative Plan of the College recognizes the fact that many 
young men desire to spend their first two years of college at home and then 
go on to a senior college. Provision is made in the program for these students 
to gain fundamental preparation for later transfer to a senior college, or to 
continue in the Evening Credit Division of New Haven College. 

Length of Program 

It is a program offering alternate periods of study and work through 
two years. The operation of the Cooperative Plan provides that half of the 
student body is in college studying at one time while the other half is on a 
cooperative job in business or industry. 

The year is divided into four ten-week periods. Half the student body 
studies in Periods One and Three and works in the other two periods. The 
other half of the student body studies in Periods Two and Four and works 
in the other two periods. 

The Study Period 

During the study period classes are held in the buildings of the College 
Woods Branch. Physical Education and recreational activities are scheduled 
at the Y.M.C.A. In order to permit as much freedom as possible in planning 

73 



74 New Haven College 

their programs, students may select technical courses in the evening, from 
courses in business, engineering, and management. The evening courses meet 
from 7:00 to 9:45 p.m. in Yale buildings used by the College. It should be 
noted that evening courses meet continuously from September through June 
regardless of whether the cooperative period is a study or a work period. 



The Work Period 

Work Schedule — On the job, the work week will be determined by the 
individual company. Students are expected to conform to the same rules 
and regulations as the regular employees. 

Cooperative Work Record — At the end of each work period the cooperat- 
ing company furnishes a written evaluation of the student's performance 
on the job. This is used as an aid in future job placement and in counsel- 
ing the student. 

Admission Requirements 

Because of the unique nature of the Cooperative Program, its admission 
requirements differ in certain respects from those of the Evening Credit 
Program. An applicant for the Cooperative Program: 

1. Must be a high school graduate or have earned a State High School 
Diploma; 

2. Must not have attended full-time college for more than one year 
prior to applying for the Cooperative Program; 

3. Must not have had more than two years of full-time work experi- 
ence; 

4. Must meet the standards of the College in respect to high school 
average; 

5. Must meet the standards of the College in respect to admission 
examinations; 

6. Must be physically fit for undertaking both employment and study. 

The College prescribes no set pattern of high school subjects as entrance 
requirements for this program. 

An applicant for the Cooperative Program should be a graduate of a 
secondary school of approved standing and should present 15 acceptable 
units of secondary school work. 

In general the applicant may be admitted on the basis of his secondary- 
school record when it shows an average grade of "C" or better, when the 
secondary school subjects bear a reasonable relationship to the courses to 
be taken at the College, and when the applicant is recommended by his 
secondary school. 



Daytime Cooperative Program 75 

Admission Procedure 

1. Call the College for information and, if possible, arrange for a pre- 
application interview. (SPruce 7-5513) 

2. Complete an application for admission furnished by the Admissions 
Office which form contains: 

a. Personal information 

b. Secondary Education Form— to be mailed to student's high school for 
completion and for mailing to New Haven College. 

3. An application fee of $5.00 must accompany the application. This fee 
is not refundable. 

4. When all information has been received and the admissions tests com- 
pleted, the applicant will be notified with regard to his admission. 

5. When the student has been advised that the conditions for admission have 
been met, he should mail a tuition deposit in the amount of twenty-five 
dollars (|25.00) to be credited on his first term bill. This deposit is a 
reservation for a place in the class and cannot be refunded if the student 
fails to enter at the expected time. 

Scholastic Regulations 

Scholastic regulations, in general, will conform to those for other di- 
visions of the College. For the Grading System in effect, refer to page 21. 

Requirements for the Degree 

The Associate of Science degree is granted upon: 

1. Completion of the sixty semester hours of required study; 

2. Completion of four work periods, and successful performance on 
cooperative job assignments; 

3. Acquisition of a 2.0 average Quality Point Ratio; 

4. Recommendation of the faculty. 

(See page 24 for further details of graduation requirements.) 

Securing Cooperative Employment 

Placement of students in Cooperative work is accomplished through 
the joint efforts of the student and the College. In most cases the College 
will be able to refer the student to companies interested in employing Co-op 
students. When this is done, the employer will be notified and the student 
will receive information for making initial interview arrangements. The 
student is expected to report the results of the interview immediately to the 
College Coordinator. The referral does not mean that employment is se- 
cured or guaranteed by the College. 



76 New Haven College 

All Co-op students are expected to actively and earnestly seek employ- 
ment through their own resources as well as those of the College. When a 
student locates a job in a company not already recognized by the College 
for Cooperative employment, the College reserves the right to approve the 
placement. 

Cooperative Employment Rules 

A Cooperative job involves a four-way relationship among the employ- 
er, the student, his alternate, and the College. Because the interests of other 
students, present and future, are often at stake, careful observance of the 
following rules is expected: 

1. Cooperative students are required to obey all rules and regulations 
of the company for which they work and are subject to all labor 
conditions, including those pertaining to liability for accidents. 

2. After placement has been made, students at school or work are not 
permitted to change groups, or leave their jobs without permission 
from the Coordinator. 

3. Any serious misunderstanding, lay-off, or other employment or labor 
difficulty must be reported immediately to the Coordinator. 

4. In case of sickness or other emergency requiring absence from work, 
the employer must be notified immediately. Should it appear that 
the absence will continue more than a day or two, the Coordinator 
should also be notified. 

5. A student abandoning a job or so conducting himself on the job as 
to cause his discharge will be subject to suspension from the College 
for breach of discipline. 



Tuition and Fees 

THE DAYTIME COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
1960-1961 



Application Fee — The application fee is $5.00, payable only once, at time 
of initial application, and is not refundable. 

Acceptance Fee — The acceptance fee is $25.00. It is payable when the 
applicant who has been accepted by the College acknowledges his accept- 
ance and confirms his intention of undertaking the program. The fee is 
applied to tuition charges. It is not refundable. 

Tuition — Tuition is $600.00 a year, payable in two payments of $300.00 
each, as specified in the schedule below. The acceptance fee will be applied 
to the first tuition payment. 



Schedule of Tuition Payment Dates 

Group A: 

$300.00- August 29, 1960 
$300.00-January 23, 1961 

Group B: 
$300.00-September 10, 1960 
).00-January 25, 1961 



Student Activity Fee — The student activity fee is $5.00 per semester, pay- 
able with tuition. . 

Refunds — No refund of tuition payments will be made for withdrawal 
from either the work or study program, or for reductions in the study 
program. 

Deferred Payments — In exceptional cases, arrangements for deferred pay- 
ments may be made through the college office, 

77 



Program of Study 



Since the aim of the Cooperative Program is to prepare students to live 
a rich and satisfying life, a major part of which involves earning a living, 
the studies are built around a group of basic daytime courses, combined 
with evening electives according to the individual's vocational interests. A 
student may elect to pursue introductory courses in Business, in Manage- 
ment, or in Engineering. In order to allow flexibility in scheduling the 
courses, each student's program will be worked out in conference with his 
college advisor. 

In addition to the sixty semester hours of credit necessary for a degree 
in the Cooperative Program, the student may elect, without additional 
charges, up to twelve semester hours of evening courses. This provision makes 
it possible for the student to obtain a wider background in his chosen field 
of study or to further explore any secondary interests he may have. 



First Year 



Sem. 
First Ten-Week Study Period Hrs. 

E 112C English Composition 3 

E 114C 
EC 133C 
P lllC 
PE lllC 
SS 115C 
•M 108C 



Speech 3 

Economics 3 

Orientation 

Physical Education 

Sociology 3 

General Mathematics (Op.) 3 
Extra Evening Elective 3 

15-18 



Sem. 

Second Ten-Week Study Period Hrs. 

E 113C English Composition S 

EC 201C Economic History of U.S. .. 3 

P 112C Orientation 

P 113C Psychology S 

PE 112C Physical Education 

SS 116C Sociology 3 

*PH lOlC Elements of Physics (Op.) .. 3 

** Extra Evening Elective 3 

15-18 



Second Year 



E 220C 
E 202C 
IE 114C 
PE 221C 
SS I21C 
•A lllC 



First Ten-Week Study Period 

Technical Report Writing 3 

Humanities 3 

Management Survey 3 

Physical Education 

Political Science 3 

Intro. Accounting (Op.) .... 3 
Extra Evening Elective 3 

15-18 



E 202C 
Phil lllC 
SS 122C 
Zool lllC 
PE 222C 
*A I12C 



Second Ten-Week Study Period 

Humanities 3 

Intro, to Problems of Phil. 3 

Political Science 3 

Human Biology 3 

Physical Education 

Intro. Accounting (Op.) .... 3 
Extra Evening Elective 3 

15-18 



* Courses offered as elective courses in the daytime. 

** Courses offered as elective courses in the evening. See course descriptions in the Evening 
Credit Program. 

The student must carry fifteen credit hours per semester. A total of sixty 
semester hours of credit are required for the degree. 



78 



Description of Courses 



m 
THE DAYTIME COOPERATIVE PROGRAM OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE 

A 1 1 1 C-1 1 2C. Introduction to Accounting. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

See course description page 56. 

Ell 2C-1 1 3C. English Composition. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E A Basic Grammar or satisfactory performance on English Placement 
Examination. 

This course is designed primarily to help students learn to write by writing— to develop 
the ability to organize thoughts quickly and effectively, to write with speed and facility, 
and to use simple written English. The course provides practice in applying these princi- 
ples to the writing of letters, memos, reports, job descriptions, and other business papers. 

E 1 14C. Speech. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of speech. The objectives are: 
to develop in the student proficiency in the use of vocal and bodily aids in various speak- 
ing situations, and to help the student gain confidence and fluency when speaking ex- 
temporaneously, as in group discussions, or in everyday conversation. Recordings are used 
for self-analysis and criticism. 

E 220C. Technical Report Writing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 1I3C. 

Included in this course of writing is the study and analysis of professional scientific 
papers, the preparation of procedures and reports on the technical and semi-technical level, 
and an introduction to the principles of business letter writing. 

E 201-202C. Humanities. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 113C. 

An approach to man's perennial search to find meaning for his place in the universe 
and perspective for his systems of knowledge. Dealing with selected intellectual, ethical 
and aesthetic problems, the student is introduced to some classics in literature, history, 
philosophy and art which provide the foundations of contemporary culture. Extensive 
reading in primary sources is expected. 

EC 133C. Economics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The course aims at an understanding of the principles, institutions, and practices 
which form the basis of our economic system and activity. Such aspects of our economy 
as production, price, exchange, and distribution are considered. The course examines the 
basic economic aspects of capitahsm and the other "isms." Opportunity is offered for the 
student to do independent work in the field of his own specialized interest. 

EC 202C. Economic History of the U. S. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The development of American economic life in the various stages of agriculture, trade, 
industry, finance, and labor. The change of economic practices and institutions particu- 
larly in the realms of business, banking, and labor is stressed as well as the changing role 
of government. 

IE 114C. Management Survey. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This is a fundamental course dealing with the history of business and industry; an 
appreciation of the functions and responsibility of business enterprise; some understanding 
of the variety of activities which go to make up our complete business system; the prob- 
lems of men, materials and machines that are involved in the making and distribution of 
the product. The intent is to provide an understanding of our highly complex industrial 
and business organizations and how they fit into our economic activity. 

79 



80 New Haven College 

M 108C. General Mathematics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A general survey of the fundamentals of mathematics, including some concepts from 
trigonometry, coordinate geometry and elementary function theory. Application of these 
ideas is made in the fields of physical, biological, and social sciences. 

P 111C-112C Orientation. No credit. 1 hour per week. First year. 

This is essentially a group guidance activity through which students are assisted in 
1) making the most satisfactory adjustment to college life and study, and 2) estabhshing 
intelligent long-range vocational goals for themselves. 

Satisfactory completion is required for graduation. 

P 1 1 3C. Psychology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a general knowledge of the important 
principles of human behavior. Topics included are: motivation, emotion, learning, per- 
sonality, intelligence, etc. The utilization of psychological knowledge in relation to every- 
day human activities is emphasized. 

PE 1 1 1C-1 12C. Physical Education. No credit. 2 hours per week. 

Varied physical training and recreational program including activities in the gym and 
swimming pool; games for fun and skill; training for the improvement of leisure sports; 
exercise; acquaintance with various sports and games requiring some proficiency. Satisfac- 
tory completion of this program is required for graduation. 

PE 221C-222C. Physical Education (second year). No credit. 2 hours per week. 

Satisfactory completion is required for graduation. 

PH 101C. Elements of Physics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 108C or equivalent. 

A general course presenting selected topics from the traditional divisions and modern 
physics. While the course does not include formal laboratory experience, the scientific 
attitude is taught through a generous use of group demonstration laboratories. 

SS 115C-116C. Sociology. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

The aim of this course is to provide the student with an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of the major institutions which form the structure of American society and their 
interaction upon each other. Particular attention is devoted to the impact of the dominant 
institution— our industrial capitalistic economy— upon all other aspects of our life— family 
structure, political organization, religion, etc. During the second semester opportunity is 
given to the student to explore in greater detail some phase of the subject which is of 
particular interest to him. 

SS 121C-122C. Political Science. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

This course deals with the structure and functions of the national government, party 
organization, national and state relations, and American politics as compared to other 
countries and the trends in modern politics. 

Zoo! 111C. Human Biology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

An introductory course representing the important biological principles as they apply 
to man. A survey is made of the anatomy and physiology of the organ systems. 



Course descriptions of elective courses in Engineering, Business Administration and 
Industrial Management will be found in section entitled "Description of Courses" in the 
Evening Credit Program section. 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 

The Daytime 
Engineering Program 



OFFERING THE DEGREES 
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



Calendar 



THE DAYTIME ENGINEERING PROGRAM 



Classes resume (Christmas recess) Monday 
Final Examinations 
Winter recess 



1960 

January 4 
January 18-22 
January 23-31 



Spring Semester 1960 

Classes begin, tuition due Monday 

Washington's Birthday (holiday) Monday 

Spring recess 

Good Friday (holiday) Friday 

Final examinations 

Commencement Sunday 

Placement examinations 



February 1 

February 22 

March 26-April 3 

April 15 

May 23-27 

June 12 

June 7-8 
August 23 and 25 



Fall Semester 1960 



Freshmen Orientation and regis- 
tration, tuition due 

Upperclassmen registration, tui- 
tion due 

Classes begin 

Thanksgiving (holiday) 

Christmas recess 



Classes resume 
Final examinations 
Winter recess 



Monday 



September 12 



Tuesday September 13 

Wednesday September 14 

Thursday and Friday November 24-25 

December 17-January2 

1961 

Tuesday January 3 

January 16-20 
January 21-29 



Classes begin, tuition due 
Spring recess 
Final examinations 
Commencement 



Spring Semester 1961 
Monday 



January 30 

March 24-April 2 

May 23-29 

June 11 



82 



The Daytime Engineering Program 

Staff Member in Charge: 
W. Robert Dresser, Chairman, Department of Engineering 



Aims and Objectives 

The Daytime Program in Engineering offers a two-year college pro- 
gram and a four-year curriculum in Industrial Engineering with General, 
Electrical, Mechanical and Metallurgical options. 

Engineering: Two-Year Associate in Science Program: This program pro- 
vides students with the typical two-year college engineering curriculum of 
a standard four-year program. It enables the young man or woman to live 
at home, thus eliminating the on-campus expenses of room and board. Since 
New Haven College courses are accredited, the student will be in a position 
to transfer with advanced standing to the four-year program, to the Even- 
ing Credit Division of the College, or to another institution. Upon comple- 
tion of seventy-two hours of credit in the prescribed two-year curriculum, 
a graduate will receive the Associate in Science degree in Engineering. 
Industrial Engineering: Bachelor of Science Program: The study of Indus- 
trial Engineering prepares a student for a successful career in the manu- 
facturing, research and service industries. Based as it is on a broad engin- 
eering background, the professional courses taken in the last two years offer 
a perspective which enables the graduate to cope with complex problem 
situations encountered in modern industry. Special attention is given in 
this program to preparing the student for the intelligent use of the com- 
puters in modern industrial practice. 

Upon completion of the sixty-eight hours of credit beyond the Associ- 
ate in Science degree (72 s.h.), a graduate will receive the Bachelor of 
Science degree in Industrial Engineering with a major in General Industrial 
Engineering or in Electrical Engineering. 

Admission Requirements 

The following are the admission requirements to this program: 

1. Graduation from an approved secondary school with a minimum of 

15 units, among which are included: 
2 units— algebra 
1 unit— plane geometry 
1/2 unit— trigonometry 
1 unit— physics 
1 unit— a second science 

2. Satisfactory placement in tests covering: 

scholastic aptitude 
mathematics 
English 
given by: 

the College Entrance Examination Board or 
New Haven College 

3. Personal interview 

83 



84 New Haven College 

Admission Procedure 

1. Call the College for information and, if possible, arrange for a 
pre-application interview. (SPruce 7-5513) 

2. Complete an application for admission furnished by the Admissions 
Office which form contains: 

a. Personal information 

b. Secondary Education Form— to be mailed to student's high school 
for completion and for mailing to New Haven College. 

3. An application fee of $5.00 must accompany the application. This 
fee is not refundable. 

4. When all information has been received and the admissions tests 
completed, the applicant will be notified with regard to his admis- 
sion. 

5. When the student has been advised that the conditions for admission 
have been met, he should mail a tuition deposit in the amount of 
twenty-five dollars ($25.00) to be credited on his first term bill. This 
deposit is a reservation for a place in the class and cannot be re- 
funded if the student fails to enter at the expected time. 

Scholastic Regulations 

Scholastic regulations, in general, will conform to those for other di- 
visions of the College. For the Grading System in effect, refer to page 21. 

Tuition and Fees 

$5.00— Application Fee— to accompany the application (not refundable). 
$25.00— Deposit— payable when notified of acceptance— credited to first se- 
mester tuition (not refundable). 
$300.00— Tuition per semester— see calendar for payment dates. 
$5.00— Student Activity Fee— per semester— payable with tuition. 
$12.50— Laboratory and Breakage Fee— per semester for each science labora- 
tory course— payable with tuition. 

Two-Year Associate in Science Program 

First Year 

Fall Spring 

Sem. Sem. 

Hrs. Lab. Hrs. Lab. 

CH lOld Chemistry 4 3 CH 102ci Chemistry _ 4 3 

D lOld Engineering Drawing 2 4 D 102d Drawing & Descriptive 

EC 133d Economics 3 Geometry 2 4 

E 105d English Composition ..3 EC 202d Economic Hist, of U.S. 3 

E 107d Speech 2 M 102d Differential Calculus ..4 

Eng lOld Intro, to Engineering 1 Pllld Psychology 3 

M lOld College Algebra and PH 106d Physics I-Mech.-Heat 3 

Calculus 4 PE112d Physical Education II 

PE Hid Physical Education I .. 



18 



19 



Daytime Engineering Program 



85 



Second Year 



E118d Modern Literature .... 3 

EM221d Mechanics— Statics 3 

M201d Integral Calculus 3 

PH205d Analytic Physics- 
Electrical 4 

SS 214d Political Science 3 

16 







3 




Comp. & Report 

Writing 3 

Elements of Elec. 

Engr 3 

Mechanics— Dynamics 3 

Differential Equations 3 
Analytic Physics 

Atomic 4 3 

SS215d Sociology 3 



E206d 

EE 222d 

EM 322d 
M202d 
PH 206d 



19 



Total— Associate in Science Degree: 72 semester hours. 



Bachelor of Science Programs 
Industrial Engineering — General Option 



Third Year 



Fall 



Sem. 
Hrs. Lab. 

IE 114d Management Survey ..3 EM 124d 

IE 119 Ind. Hygiene and IE 342d 

Safety 3 IE 346d 

IE 241 d Methods and Motion EE 336d 

Study 3 3 PS 225 

MT 119d Engineering Materials 3 

PS 223d Personnel Admin 3 PS 244 

Elective 3 

18 3 



Spring 



Sem. 
Hrs. Lab. 



Mechanical Processes 3 

Work Measurement .. 3 

Statist. Methods 4 

Industrial Electronics 3 
Human Relations in 

Industry 3 

Management Labor 

Relations 3 

19 





3 




Fourth Year 












E 41 Id Humanities 3 

IE 23 Id Accounting & Cost 

Control 4 

IE 422d Analytic Methods 3 

IE 501 Data Processing 3 

Elective 3 

16 

Total— Bachelor of Science Degree: 140 semester hours 



IE 443d 
IE 234d 
IE 436 
IE 504 d 
IE 502 



Factory Planning 3 

Production Control ..3 

Quality Control 3 

Laboratory— Thesis .... 3 3 

Operations Research.. 3 

15^ 3 



Industrial Engineering — Electrical Option 



Third Year 



Fall 



Sem. 
Hrs. Lab. 

EE 331 A. C. Circuits 3 EE 332 

EE 345d Electronic Engineering 3 EE 342d 

IE 114d Management Survey ..3 EM 124d 

IE 24 Id Methods & Motions IE 342d 

Studies 3 3 IE 346d 

MT 119d Engineering Materials 3 EE 336d 

PS 223d Personnel Admin 3 

IS 3 



Spring 



Sem. 
Hrs. Lab. 



A. C. Circuits 3 



Electric Machinery .... 
Mechanical Processes 
Work Measurements .. 
Statistical Methods .... 
Industrial Electronics 



3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

19 




3 







86 New Haven College 

Fourth Year 

E 41 Id Humanities __ 3 EE 452d 

EE 451d Network Analysis 3 EE 442 

EE 441 Electronic Computers 3 3 

or EE 456 

EE 455 Servomechanisms 3 IE 234d 

IE 231d Accounting & Cost IE 443d 

Control 4 IE 504d 

IE 442d Analytical Methods ..3 

16 3 

Total— Bachelor of Science Degree: 140 semester hours. 



Network Analysis 3 

Electronic Computers 3 



3 


Servomechanisms 3 





Production Control .. 3 





Factory Planning 3 

Laboratory— Thesis 3 



3 


15 


6 



Description of Courses 



CH 101-102d. General Chemistry. Credit, 8 semester hours. 

An intensive treatment of inorganic and organic chemistry with some stress laid on 
industrial and engineering applications. Laboratory projects require proficiency in both 
qualitative and quantitative procedures. 

Laboratory & Breakage Fee: $12.50 per semester 

D lOld. Engineering Drawing. Credit, 2 semester hours. 

(1 lecture hour, 3 laboratory hours) 

This is an elementary course in engineering drawing designed to teach the use of 
instruments, the fundamental principles of projection, drafting room standards and con- 
ventions, lettering, selection and use of scales, orthographic projections, revolutions, de- 
veloped surfaces, intersections and auxiliary views, and the making and dimensioning of 
complete working drawings of simple machine parts. 

D 1 02d. Drav\^ing and Descriptive Geometry. Credit, 2 semester hours. 

(1 lecture hour, 3 laboratory hours) 

Prerequisite: D lOld or equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Engineering Drawing but includes the basic principles 
of space relationships with emphasis on the solution of engineering problems. Principal 
views; auxiliary views, oblique views, line and plane problems, revolution, surfaces and 
developments, surfaces and intersections, and warped surfaces are studied. 

E 105d. English Composition. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A study of the mechanics of composition and accepted usage to develop effective self- 
expression; a study of words to enlarge and strengthen vocabulary; a study of selected 
literary forms to enhance the student's appreciation and understanding of them, and to 
lay the foundation for more extensive work in succeeding courses. 

E 107d. Speech. Credit, 2 semester hours. 

This course serves as an introduction to the principles of speech. TTie objectives are: 
to develop in the student proficiency in the use of vocal and bodily aids in various speak- 
ing situations, and to help the student gain confidence and fluency when speaking ex- 
temporaneously, as in group discussions, or in everyday conversation. Recordings are used 
for self -analysis and criticism. 

Ell 8d. Modern Literature. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a general understanding of the various kinds 
of literature being written today and to acquaint him with representative samples of recent 
fiction, biography, essays, poetry, and drama. The reading and classroom discussion will be 
supplemented by lectures which will attempt to provide certain theories of criticism and 
to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of literature. 



Description of Courses 87 

E 206d. Composition and Report Writing. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: E 105d. 

The principles of structure and style as applied to both commercially and artistically 
significant prose are studied. A series of papers ot gradually increasing complexity on 
themes determined by individual interests and objectives is undertaken including individ- 
ual and group criticism and revision to meet high professional standards. Included in this 
course of writing for the engineering student is the study and analysis of the professional 
scientific paper, the preparation of procedures and reports on the technical and semi- 
technical level, and an introduction to the principles of business letter writing. 

E 41 Id. Humanities. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: E 118d and E 206d. 

An approach to man's perennial search to find meaning for his place in the universe 
and perspective for his systems of knowledge. Dealing with selected intellectual, ethical 
and aesthetic problems, the student is introduced to some classics in literature, history, 
philosophy and art which provide the foundations of contemporary culture. 

EC 1 33d. Economics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

The course aims at an understanding of the principles, institutions, and practices 
which form the basis of our economic system and activity. Such aspects of our economy 
as production, price, exchange, and distribution will be considered. The course examines 
the basic economic aspects of capitalism and the other "isms". Opportunity is offered to 
the student to do independent work in the field of his own specialized interest. 

EC 202d. Economic History of the United States. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EC 133d. 

The development of American economic life in the various stages of agriculture, 
trade, industry, finance, and labor. The change of economic practices and institutions 
particularly in the realms of business, banking, and labor is stressed as well as the 
changing role of government. 

EE 222d. Elements of Electrical Engineering. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PH 205d. 

This course consists of the fundamental concepts of electricity. It includes Ohm's 
law and Kirchoff's laws, a study of the properties of conductors and insulators, nonlinear 
resistance circuits, magnetic circuits and fields, induced and generated electromotive 
force, and the dielectric circuit. A brief survey is made of the a-c circuits, d-c and a-c 
machines and electronic tubes and circuits. 

EE 336d. Industrial Electronics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222d. 

Analysis and design of the electronic components used in industrial processes; per- 
formance tests on selected electronic apparatus such as power rectifiers, motor controls, 
voltage regulators, radio frequency heating equipment, resistance welding controls, mag- 
netic amplifiers and introduction to feedback control systems. 

EE 342d. Electrical Machinery. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222d. 

The basic theory of AC circuits and DC machines is combined with electromagnetics 
in a study of basic AC machinery. Single phase, poly-phase and auto transformers, poly- 
phase alternators and induction motors, Ward-Leonard and amplidyne systems and feed- 
back servomotors. Applications of the various devices to servomechanisms are considered. 
Laboratory work in this equipment supplements the lectures. 

EE 331-332. Alternating Current Circuits. Credit, 6 semester hours. 
See course description page 62. 

EE 333d. Electronic Engineering. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: EE 222d. 

This course is largely concerned with the analysis of basic electron tubes and senii- 
conductors and the circuits making up more complex electronic devices A part of the 
course is assigned to the design and analysis of apparatus used in pracuce, both in industry 
and communications. 



88 New Haven College 

EE 441-442. Electronic Computers. Credit, 6 semester hours. 
Prerequisites: EE 332 and EE 345. 
See course description page 62. 

EE 451-452d. Network Analysis. Credit, 6 semester hours. 

Prerequisite. EE 332. 

This course includes the formulation of the basic notions in network theory, with 
emphasis on the n-pole. General techniques of circuit analysis and their application to 
the analysis of vacuum tube, transistor, and other types of circuits. Standard modes of 
characterization of n-terminal-pair networks and an analysis of the basic properties of 
various types of network functions. An introduction to the theory of electromagnetic 
fields with stress on physical concepts and engineering applications. The fundamentals of 
electromagnetic theory in vector notation and Maxwell's equations. 

EE 455-456. Servomechanisms and Feedback Control Systems. Credit, 6 semester hours. 
See course description page 62. 

EM 1 24d. Mechanical Processes. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic metal cutting pro- 
cesses. Machining properties of metals are developed both with respect to single and 
multiple point metal cutting tools as well as the adaptability of standard and special 
machine tools employed by the metal industry. The lathe, milling machine, planer, shaper, 
saw and other allied machine tools where metal is removed by chip formation are specifi- 
cally covered. Simultaneously, the selection and application of basic cutting tool materials 
is developed for each basic machine. The approach is planned to enable the engineer to 
choose or substitute several basic machine tools for specific applications. 

EM 221 d. Mechanics-Statics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: M 102d and PH 106d. 

This course includes the theory and application of the principles of static equilibrium, 
stress in framed structures, friction, center of gravity, and moments of inertia. 

EM 322d. Mechanics-Dynamics. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite. EM 22 Id. 

A study is made of the application of the principles of dynamics to the analysis of 
special topics in machines, such as the effect of inertia, flywheel design, balancing, gov- 
ernors, and gyroscopic effects. An introduction to vibration and critical speeds is pre- 
sented. 

ENG. lOld. Introduction to Engineering. No credit, (one hour) 

A survey to introduce the student to specific obligations of engineering students, to 
the broad concepts of engineering in several areas and to appraise both the human and 
technical aspects. Slide-rule instruction included. Required of all first-year engineering 
students. Satisfactory completion is required for graduation. 

IE 114d. Management Survey. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This is an introductory course in management. It introduces the student to all the 
major functions of industry, their interrelationship, and how they are brought together 
through organization. Thus the student receives instruction in the preliminaries of 
methods, cost, production control, product development, finance, physical facilities, qual- 
ity control, plant engineering, industrial relations, job evaluation, sales, advertising, 
budgets, and records. 

IE 231 d. Accounting and Cost Control. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 114d. 

A large percentage of the cost of a product is incurred by the supervisors and fore- 
men through whose departments the product passes on its way from raw material to 
finished state. To control and reduce this cost is an important part of their job. Only if 
they understand all the factors comprising such costs can they accomplish this end. This 
course will familiarize them with the elements of cost necessary to control, stressing 
particularly the indirect or overhead elements— their measurement and control. 



Daytime Engineering Program 89 

IE 234d. Production Control. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite. IE 114d. 

The instruction stresses the basic principles that govern production control in an 
industrial plant. These principles are worked out in the problems and controlling ma- 
terials, in routing, scheduling, and dispatching. The intent of the course is to familiarize 
the student with the use of the most up-to-date methods in this field, including visual 
control systems. 

IE 24 Id. Methods and Motion Study. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: IE 114d. 

The first half of the course presents the techniques of process and motion analysis 
and the principles of motion economy. These are demonstrated from applications drawn 
from an extensive film library. The second half comprises intensive work in the laboratory. 
Practical problems from shops and offices are analyzed for improvement. Motion pictures 
are taken of the improved jobs and these pictures are then subjected to a micromotion 
analysis. By this means the student becomes motion conscious and better able to apply 
correct principles of motion to jobs, through his ability to visualize motion sequences. 

IE 342d. Work Measurements. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 241d. 

A basic time study course. Job breakdown into elements. Use of stop watch and other 
timing devices. Analysis of recorded data, application of normalizing and fatigue factors. 
Computation of standard times. The setting of synthetic time standards from standard 
data and the use of charts and curves to simplify applications are demonstrated. Uses of 
standard data for improvement of methods, tools, fixtures, and machines, and for cost 
control. Time studies are made on a variety of hand and machine operations performed 
in the laboratory. Facility in rating of time studies is aided by concentrated rating ses- 
sions utilizing films. 

IE 346d. Statistical Methods (with Lab.) Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 202d. 

This course consists of lecture and laboratory work and an introduction to the ap- 
plication of statistical techniques to industrial and engineering problems, probability and 
distribution theory, measures of central tendency and dispersion in relation to population 
and samples: statistical inference problems classified in terms of (1) estimation procedures, 
(2) tests of hypotheses, and (3) confidence intervals: differentiation of Type I and Type 
II errors and their significance for problems of statistical inference. 

IE 422d. Analytical Methods in Industrial Engineering. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 346d. 

Applications of modern algebraic methods in industrial practice, the application of 
statistical methods to the analysis of engineering and production problems, the prepara- 
tion of charts and nomograms, introduction to game theory and mathematical pro- 
gramming. 

IE 436d. Quality Control. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

See course description page 63 

IE 443d. Factory Planning. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: IE 342d. 

Factors in plant location, design and layout of equipment. The basic principles of 
obtaining information essential for carrying out such investigations. This is a survey 
course which also covers briefly such practices as material handling, storage and store- 
room, maintenance, and service departments in modern factories. 

M lOld. College Algebra and Calculus. Credit, 4 semester hours. 

This course includes the fundamental relations in algebraic operations, analytic ge- 
ometry, simultaneous equations, determinants, quadratic equations, complex quantities, 
partial fractions, inequalities, points, graphs, rectangular and polar coordinates, derivatives 
and antiderivatives. 



90 New Haven College 

M. 102d. DifFerential Calculus. Credit, 4 semester hours 

Prerequisite: M lOld. 

This course includes the fundamental notions of the calculus, differentiation and in- 
tegration of algebraic functions, differentials, maxima and minima. Applications are made 
to simple problems in geometry and mechanics, such as the determination of velocity, 
accelerations, areas, volumes, and pressures. The analytic geometry of the straight line and 
of tiie conic sections is introduced as an attribute to the calculus. 

M 201 d. Integral Calculus. Credit, 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: M 102d. 

This course includes integration, geometrical applications to lengths of plane curves, 
areas, volumes of solids; mechanical applications to work, pressure, centers of gravity, and 
moments of inertia; analytical geometry of three dimensions; double and triple integra- 
tion with application to areas, volume, moments of inertia, parametric equations and cen- 
ters of gravity. 

M 202d. Differential Equations. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: M 201d. 

This course includes Infinite series; Fourier series; partial differentiation; and line 
integrals. The solution of ordinary differential equations including the principal types of 
first and second-order equations, simultaneous equations, and linear equations with con- 
stant coefficients, and the introduction to operational methods by means of the Laplace 
transformation. 

MT 119d. Engineering Materials. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

A survey of the principal metals used as engineering materials with concentration on 
the properties and apphcations of ferrous alloys. Attention is directed to the production 
of these materials, methods of fabrication and typical properties of the finished product. 
This course is designed to offer the student a complete coverage of the elements of physi- 
cal metallurgy. In general, the avenue of approach is designed to assist engineers who must 
select metals and alloys for engineering use. Suitable laboratory work is included. 

P Hid. Psychology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course is designed to give the student a general knowledge of the important 
principles of human behavior. Topics included are: motivation, emotion, learning, per- 
sonality, intelligence, etc. The utilization of psychological knowledge in relation to every- 
day human activities will be emphasized. 

PE 111 -11 2d. Physical Education. No credit. 

Varied physical training and recreational program including activities in the gym and 
swimming pool; games for fun and skill; training for the improvement of leisure sports; 
exercise; acquaintance with various sports and games requiring some proficiency. Satisfac- 
tory completion of this program is required for graduation. 

PH 1 06d. Physics 1 . Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Analytical Physics I: Mechanics and Heat, Statics, kinematics; Newton's laws; work, 
energy and power; conservation of momentum; circular motion; rotational dynamics; heat 
and energy; kinetic theory. 

PH 205d. Physics II, (with laboratory). Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Analytical Physics II. Electricity and Magnetism. Electrostatics; direct currents; mag- 
netic effect of a current; electrical instruments; induced emf; inductance and capacitance; 
simple harmonic motion; physical basis for a-c circuits and basic electronics are studied. 

PH 206d. Physics III (with laboratory). Credit, 4 semester hours. 

Analytical Physics III: Sound, Light, and Atomic Physics. Fundamentals of wave mo- 
tion; sound; geometrical optics; physical optics; radiation; relativistic mass-energy; elec- 
trons, photons and their interactions; atomic structiure; nuclear structure and reactions are 
studied. 



Daytime Engineering Program 91 

PS 223d. Personnel Administration. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisites: P Hid and IE 114d. 

The aim of this course is to provide a foundation in fundamental concepts and a 
general knowledge of techniques in the administration of personnel relations. 

The course covers such subjects as the nature of personnel administration, the han- 
dling of personnel problems, employee attitudes and morale. Such techniques of personnel 
administration as recruitment, interviews, placement, training, employee rating as well as 
wage pohcies and administration are dealt with. In order to secure breadth and depth in 
the approach to personnel problems, simple case studies are used at appropriate points 
throughout the course. 

PS 225d. Human Relations in Management. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: PS 223d. 

This course continues the study of human relations begun in PS 123 with accent upon 
the individual's relation to his co-worker. Basic psychological concepts such as motiva- 
tion, personality, morale, etc. establish the groundwork for discussion within the class of 
the case studies dealing with associates, subordinates and superiors. 

PS 244d. Management-Labor Relations. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

Prerequisite: 223d. 

This course aims to present the problems involved in the relations of management and 
labor. It begins with a history of the labor movement, then considers the intervention of 
government in labor relations, and explains the legal framework within which plant 
practices evolve. The discussion of current practices in negotiation, in grievance handling, 
and in the settlement of disputes is designed to bring out a point of view which may con- 
tribute to a greater stability in relations. When possible, guest speakers contribute to the 
establishment of that point of view. 

SS 214d. Political Science. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

This course deals with the structure and functions of the national government, party 
organization, national and state relations, and American politics as compared to other 
countries and the trends in modern politics. 

SS 215d. Sociology. Credit, 3 semester hours. 

In this course the student studies the role of culture in society; the person and 
personality; groups and group behavior; institutions; social interaction and social change. 

College-Community Programs 

A particular function of the community college is the ability to or- 
ganize and develop programs of study which will serve the more specific 
needs of an area industry or organization. 

New Haven College has successfully undertaken these programs as the 
opportunity has presented itself. One example was the Pratt-Read Electri- 
cal Engineering Program in which the College and students from Pratt, 
Read & Co., Inc. and other companies joined in the training of electrical 
engineering aides. This program was an off-campus or extension program 
with classes being held twice weekly in the afternoon at Valley Regional 
High School in Essex. 

These programs are entirely company financed. Candidates must quali- 
fy by passing the New Haven College entrance examinations after being 
approved through testing and interviewing by a screening committee from 
the company. Class schedules vary with the program. In the case of the 



92 New Haven College 

recently completed Olin Mathieson program students attended classes three 
day a week from 3:30 to 6:00 p.m. for eight 15-week semesters. They re- 
mained on their present jobs for the first semester at which point they 
transferred to engineering departments for on-the-job trainee assignments 
during the remainder of the program. 

A third program is the Police Science curriculum, co-sponsored by New 
Haven College and the New Haven Police Academy which is a three-year 
Associate Degree program for professional policemen in the New Haven 
area. Through the financial aid of the New Haven Foundation, the tuition 
charges have been significantly reduced for those officers selected for the 
program. 



THE DIVISION 

of 

SPECIAL STUDIES 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



The Division of Special Studies 

Staff Member in Charge: Virginia M. Parker 



Aims 



The special courses are designed to provide non-credit studies of general 
interest to adults of the community and to meet specific training needs of 
industrial personnel. Because these courses have arisen to fill needs in the 
New Haven area, it is anticipated that new courses will be added to the 
curriculum of this division as the needs are recognized and as the course 
materials are developed. These courses are of particular interest to adults 
who wish to take certain courses without pursuing a full academic program. 

Schedule of Hours 

All classes meet from 7:15 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., and each course meets one 
night per week unless otherwise noted. Courses vary in length from six 
sessions to seventeen sessions. A complete schedule is issued in August and 
January. 

Admission Requirements 

For certain courses the only requirement for admission is the interest of 
the applicant. For other courses, the applicant's present position and ex- 
perience are the primary factors considered in admission. 

The College will he pleased to mail out special bulletins which describe 
individual courses. 

Registration Procedure 

Registration may be accomplished by mail or in person. Interested 
persons should request a special course application card. Receipt of the card 
plus tuition fee by the College constitutes formal class enrollment. 

Registration may sometimes be insufficient to justify a class in certain 
courses scheduled to be offered. In such cases, the College reserves the right 
to cancel the course, with a full refund of tuition paid to the applicants or 
their companies. 

Tuition will be refunded only if the above situation occurs or if tuition 
is received after the class quota for enrollment has been filled. 

Certificate Requirements 

A notice indicating successful completion of a course is mailed to each 
registrant. A duplicate of this is mailed to the registrant's company upon 
request. Information is given on title, length of course and number of ses- 
sions which registrant has attended. 

94 



Division of Special Studies 95 

A special certificate indicating successful completion of the course is 
available also if the student desires one. Successful completion indicates that 
the student has attended classes for at least three-fourths of the class sessions 
and has been an active class participant, with the latter being verified by the 
class instructor. 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The following are typical of the types of courses offered in the Division 
of Special Studies. Descriptive sheets on each course giving price, length of 
course, and other pertinent information will be mailed upon request. 

SP 1 . Ways of Looking at Art 

The purpose of this course is to increase the understanding and enjoyment of widely 
differing styles of painting, sculpture and architecture through a study of changing meth- 
ods and aims in art, to teach the student what to look for in the work of art, and to de- 
velop his own judgment and appreciation. 

The course consists of slide lectures, discussions and visits to the Yale Art Gallery, 
with emphasis on the visual experience rather than the historical approach. Mimeo- 
graphed materials are furnished class members. No formal background in art or art 
history is needed. Course consists of fifteen weekly sessions, under the direction of Miss 
A. Elizabeth Chase, Decent of the Yale Art Gallery. 

SP 4. Creative Thinking ("Brainstorming") 

This is a course designed (1) to make the individual aware of the importance of 
creative effort, (2) to demonstrate through discussion and participation just how each in- 
dividual is capable of producing more and better ideas for solving personal and business 
problems, (3) to create an atmosphere conducive to the acceptance and development of 
creative ideas. The course content includes such topics as: the importance of creativity, 
ways to develop creativity, deterrents to creativity, processes of ideation, stimulants to 
creative thought, and brainstorming. Following brief and informal presentations by the 
instructor, all students are encouraged and guided into discussion techniques, brainstorm- 
ing, and self-interrogation. Course consists of six weekly sessions of two hours duration 
each. 

SP 8. Creative Writing Workshop 

A seminar for students who are interested in improving their style of writing, whether 
they are beginners or professionals, by a study of techniques and methods and by self- 
criticism. Students may submit material in any form— short story, essay, poetry, drarna, 
biography— to be read to the class and criticized by both class and instructor. Special 
projects in creative writing may also be carried out by individual students with the in- 
structor's approval. The standard aimed at is professional. Open to all interested persons. 
Course consists of fifteen weekly sessions. 

SP 9. Advanced Fiction Workshop 

This is an intensive writing class designed for those persons who may be considered 
"near professional" in a fiction way; or for professional newswriters, scriptwriters and 
others who have a proficiency with words and an ambition to achieve publication in the 
short story, play, or novel field. Class will attempt to carry along a growing awareness of 
what other writers have done with the short story, through reading 30 short stories. Class 
discussions will center mainly around intellectual questions which have attracted creative 
persons for centuries, and around specific problems individual writers are rneeting in 
their struggle to improve their own writing. Class meets twice a week for 30 sessions. 

SP 10. News and Feature Writing 

A seminar-type class designed to teach the elements both of straight news writing 
and news-feature writing for daily and Sunday newspapers, trade journals, house organs 
of all kinds, and general magazines. Discussions also survey various types of markets for 
the news feature. Course consists of fifteen weekly sessions. 



96 New Haven College 

SP 11. Technical Writing Workshop 

This course covers the general ground rules for good technical report writing. A con- 
siderable portion of class time is devoted to actual preparation of an inter-office technical 
memo, a technical report and a handbook. Particular emphasis is placed upon organization 
and readability of material, good rhetoric and selection of style. A review of the more 
common errors and pitfalls found in technical writing is given. Basic material for the 
writing projects is distributed to the class. The course is held for ten weekly sessions. 

SP 12. Public Speaking for Business 

The purpose of this twelve-week course is to develop clear, logical thinking in any 
speaking situation, to learn specific techniques for overcoming "stagefright", and to learn 
how to organize speech material for any given situation. Extemporaneous speaking, the 
conducting of business meetings, and special work on securing audience attention will be 
taken up in this practical course. 

SP 14. Graphic Arts and Design 

This course is designed for industrial editors, advertising personnel, printing de- 
signers, printing craftsmen and others concerned with the design of printed material. 

Students, using copy and photographic material, work out solutions to problems in 
class after which the instructor summarizes design and graphic arts principles, using class 
work for illustrations. 

Emphasis of the course is placed on good design— how to express type and photo- 
graphic material in the most effective and attractive manner. However, other subjects re- 
lated to graphic arts will be examined including paper, color, control of printing costs, 
when to use what process, styles of type, and fitting copy into fixed spaces. 12 sessions. 

SP 25. Professional Engineers Examination Refresher 

Intended to be a refresher course with the primary purpose of preparing for the En- 
gineering Fundamentals section of the Professional Engineers examination. Use of past 
examinations and the working of problems therein is a major part of the instruction in 
this fifteen-week course. Admission is open to those who wish to take the Professional 
Engineers Examination and believe themselves qualified. 

SP 41. Personnellnterviewing 

This twelve-week course is designed both as a refresher for the professional personnel 
man and for any administrator or prospective administrator desiring to avail himself of 
interviewing as an effective tool in his work. The interviewer and his work, interviewing 
techniques, and types of interviews are some of the areas which will be covered in this 
survey course. 

SP 43. Supervision lA — Relations Between Supervisor and Employees 

This is an introductory course in the basic principles of human relations and deals 
with such topics as: What human relations is, current problems of human relations and 
how they come about, cause-result approach to behavior, the individual and the group, 
reactions to frustration and the blocking of motives. Types, functions, and principles of 
interviewing are included. The class has six weekly sessions. 

SP 44. Supervision IB— Situations in Human Relations 

Building on the principles of Supervision LA, this course focuses upon the application 
of the basic principles of human relations to common, everyday situations encountered on 
the job. Through practice in the analysis of typical situations, participants get an orderly 
approach to the solution of human relations problems. The class meets for six weekly 
sessions. 

SP 50. Transistor Electronics 

The purpose of this fifteen-week course is to provide interested engineers or physicists 
with a basic understanding of the transistor and the knowledge required for transistor 
circuit design. The course covers the elements of semiconductor theory, diode and trans- 
istor design, multiple element transistors and engineering applications, including amplifiers, 
oscillators and switching circuits for electronic computers and telephone dialing. It is de- 
signed for practicing engineers, equipment designers who are confronted with the problems 
involving diodes and transistors and should also be of interest to college seniors in physics 
or engineering who are interested in understanding the functioning of the transistor. 



Division of Special Studies 97 

Applicants for admission should have two years of college work in engineering mathe- 
matics or physics. In some instances persons interested in taking the course may have a 
strong work background in the field though they may lack the formal prerequisites. This 
may be discussed with the instructor. 

SP 55. Theory of Automatic Feedback Control Systems 
(Servomechanisms I and II) 

The course starts with a review of the applicable theoretical background. The analysis 
of electric and mechanical systems is simplified by the introduction of the LaPlace trans- 
form method. The analysis of the system from the stability point of view is considered. 
The Nyquist criteria and the criteria of Routh, Hurwitz, and Leonhard are studied. The 
problem of synthesis of an equalizing network for the system which will allow it to meet 
given accuracy and stability specifications are considered in detail. Both series and minor 
loop techniques are considered. Load disturbances and noise problems are covered. The 
course concludes with advanced topics as time permits. Admission presupposes at least one 
year of successful study in an accredited college, including college-level physics and mathe- 
matics through differential and integral calculus. 

There are two fifteen-week sections in this course. Servomechanisms I and II. Entrance 
to Servomechanisms II may be gained only after taking Servomechanisms I or after dis- 
cussion with the instructor indicates that the person's work experience and general back- 
ground qualify him for admission. 

SP 57. Servomechanisms Components 

The object of this course is to establish the transfer function for the elements and 
establish the characteristics important in control system design. The course will consider 
the various components used in control systems from the system point of view considering 
the electric, mechanical pneumatic and hydraulic elements. Admission presupposes that 
the applicant has taken the prerequisite course in Servomechanisms Theory, such as Servo- 
mechanisms I; otherwise permission of the instructor is required. 15 sessions. 

SP 65. Fundamentals of Electroplating 

The course presents a broad survey of modern electroplating theory and practice, as- 
sumes no previous knowledge of electroplating. Electrochemical theory, electricity, platmg 
solution operations analysis on an elementary level are covered. Fifteen weekly sessions 
are held. 

SP 66. Chemistry for Electroplating 

This fifteen-week course aims to facilitate the training of personnel engaged in plating 
by supplementing practical plating experience with an understanding of electroplating 
practice. It is designed to meet the needs of plating room personnel up to and including 
the plating foreman. The purpose of this course is to give the student a knowledge of the 
chemical reactions which take place in the common plating solutions, and to give some 
insight into the chemical nature of the metals and reagents encountered in the plating 
industry. 

SP 67. Electroplating Solutions 

This course has been developed to facilitate the training of personnel in plating by 
supplementing practical plating experience with an understanding of the theory involved. 
Applicant should have previously taken Chemistry for Electroplating or have had a year 
of college-level chemistry for entrance to this fifteen-week course. 

SP 68. Electroplating Practice 

This course is designed to give the plater a broader knowledge of modem electroplat- 
ing methods with emphasis on the physical equipment used in the shop and on processes 
other than the electroplating process. 



0. Statistics for Management 

This course is designed to provide an understanding of scientific sampling and to de- 

p some competence in the use of elementary sampling techniques. An introduction u 



98 New Haven College 

given to procedures for interpreting results of simple experiments as to whether such 
results are significantly different. Control charts are explained as an alternative approach 

suitable for many data handling problems. Class meets weekly for ten weeks. 

SP 85. Programming for Punched Card Accounting 

The purpose of this twelve-week course is to teach the basic principles of punched 
card accounting with particular attention being given to the latest developments in pro- 
gramming of a computer type machine. Payroll, billing and accounts receivable, inventory, 
sales analysis, production control and budgetary control are covered. 

SP 86. Elementary Data Processing 

This fifteen-week course is an introduction to the basic theories of Punched Card 
Accsunting and the operating features of the equipment. It also surveys some of the ac- 
counting functions capable of being automated. Regular class work is supplemented by 
seminars conducted by representatives from business and industrial organizations which 
utilize punched card accounting methods. 

SP 87. Advanced Data Processing (Programming for a Business Computer) 

This fifteen-week course is an introduction to the new field of business computers and 
is designed to give a broad view of magnetic storage machines and the stored program 
concept. Class will study operational features of a number of types and laboratory work 
in programming and program testing will be performed on a late model, medium-size 
business computer. 

SP 110. Time Study I — Making the Time Study 

Introduction to time study, making the stop-watch study, element breakdown, con- 
tinuous and snap back studies, non-cyclical elements, foreign elements, summarizing 
studies, slide rule practice, pro-rating time values, what to include in the cycle time and 
what to include as an allowance, the effect of allowances on the cycle time, how the 
calculations are made. 6 sessions. 

SP 112. Time Study II — Leveling or Performance Rating 

Introduction to leveling, common types of rating scales, factory operations brought 
to class, time studies rated, results checked against actual cycle time. Four practice ses- 
sions. 

SP 113. Time Study III — Down Time Study and Group Study 

General approach to down time studies, activity of man and machine charts, intro- 
duction to ratio delay time study, analysis and discussion of man-machine studies brought 
in by class, case examples of group time study, analysis and discussion of group time study 
brought in by class. 6 sessions 

SP 114. Time Study IV — Methods 

Introduction to flow process chart, introduction to principles of motion economy and 
work place layout, problems in work place lay-out brought in by students, introduction 
to right and left hand charts, practice in time study comparison of variations of assembly 
operation methods, micromotion study. 6 sessions. 

SP 125. Elemental Time Standards 

The course discusses the origin of this work measurement system and its various in- 
dustrial applications. Detailed consideration is given to all types of manual motions as to 
their identification, classification and time factor. The principles of limiting and combining 
motions %vith group practice in recording and combining simultaneous motions of the 
arms, hands, and other parts of the body is explained. As class progresses, students bring 
in selected assemblies to which the rules that apply to identifying and classifying all of 
the various motions found in the course of manual work are applied. Class meets one 
night per week for fifteen weeks. 

SP 1 30. Methods — Time Measurement 

This fifteen-week course will be of particular interest to industrial engineers, methods 
engineers, time study engineers and members of production supervision and management 
interest in the potential of M-T M as a practical tool for work measurement and methods 



Division of Special Studies 99 

analysis. The first ten meetings are devoted to a discussion of the basic hand and body 
motions with emphasis on the purpose, type and breakoff point of each. The course covers 
the principles of limiting and simultaneous motions and the observation and recording of 
these motions. The practical use of M-T M for estimating standards from drawing and 
samples and its effect on plant layout and production planning is indicated. 

SP 140. Basic Production Control 

Presents important elements of production control such as introduction, planning, ma- 
terials handling, routing, scheduling, dispatching and follow-up. Material covers the over- 
all functions of production control and their relationships. Class meets one night per week 
for six weeks. 

SP 141. Advanced Production Control 

Part I pursues intensively major problems involved in production planning, routing, 
scheduling, and machine loading. Part II pursues intensively major problems involved in 
dispatching and follow-up. This is a 12-session course. 

SP 142. Production Control Systems Analysis 

This course assumes a comprehensive knowledge of the principles of production con- 
trol and comprises an analysis of actual systems in operation. The course alternates with 
five plant visits and class discussions thereof. The plants visited may vary but they are 
chosen with the view of furnishing the participant a good cross-section of types of pro- 
duction control systems in operation in New Haven and vicinity. There are twelve sessions. 

SP 150. Fundamentals of Inventory Management 

This course is designed for the serious management student and for those persons 
whose duties involve the creation or acquisition of inventory. It is a nontechnical course 
which is divided into two parts. The first part covers the principles of inventory manage- 
ment, including an analysis of industrial inventories, economic ordering quantities, sta- 
tistical reordering points, inventory carrying costs and techniques for controlling inventory. 
The second section covers systems and records for inventory control. The course consists 
of twelve weekly sessions. 

SP 151. Quality Control 

This twelve-session course is designed to acquaint the student with modem methods 
used by industry in order to achieve quality of their products. Topics discussed will be: 
preventing defects, organizing for quality, locating chronic sources of trouble, coordinating 
specifications, manufacturing, and inspection. The use of control charts and the selection 
of modern sampling plans will also be given attention during the course. 

SP 152. Basic Principles of Purchasing 

This 15-session course should be of interest to buyers, expediters and middle man- 
agement people with limited experience in the field of purchasing who wish to improve 
their knowledge of basic purchasing techniques and practices. Such topics as the purchas- 
ing function, organization and communication, relations with other departments, pur- 
chasing procedure, specifications and quality control, inventory control and purchase lot 
size, vendor selection and relations and other related topics are covered. 

SP 153. Advanced Industrial Purchasing I 

A 15-session advanced course in industrial purchasing offered in coop>eration with 
The Purchasing Agents' Association of Connecticut, Inc. Emphasizes the economic and 
financial aspects of procurement, including such topics as inventory management, business 
ratio analysis, understanding financial statements, budgets, purchase of capital equip- 
ment, and other related topics. Prerequisite for admission to this seminar-type course is 
completion of course in Basic Principles of Purchasing or the equivalent in experience. 

SP 154. Advanced Industrial Purchasing 11 

A 15-week supplementary course to Advanced Industrial Purchasing I which em- 
phasizes the organizational and human relations aspects of procurement. Topics covered 
include organization for procurement, purchasing policies, ethical considerations, reci- 
procity, effective purchasing management, personnel selection and training, office layout 
and evaluating departmental performance. Prerequisite for admission to this course is 
satisfactory completion of Basic Principles of Purchasing, or the equivalent in experience. 



100 Division of Special Studies 

Both Advanced Industrial Purchasing I and II are intended especially for purchasing 
agents, directors of purchasing and buyers, middle and top management personnel 
interested in increasing their knowledge of the broader aspects of procurement particu- 
larly as it affects the company's profit position. 

SP 158. Applied Powder Metallurgy 

The object of this course is to familiarize Production and Design Engineering per- 
sonnel with the application of Powder Metallurgy as a production process. It is an eight- 
session course covering the various phases of engineering, tooling, processing and controls 
used in the manufacture of powder metal structural parts and bearings. The course is 
designed primarily for foremen, supervisors and staff management persons interested in 
knowing more about this field. Classes meet for eight two-hour sessions, once a week. 

SP 1 60. Simplification of OfTice Procedures 

This twelve-week course is designed to demonstrate the possibilities that exist in every 
office for simplification of methods and reduction of clerical costs through the application 
of the basic techniques and methods of work simplification and scientific management. 
The purpose of the course is to show how to make profitable changes in office procedures 
and forms and how to develop and install supervisory tools and techniques. This is a 
practical approach rather than an academic one. 

SP 162. Cost Control for Better Management 

This twelve-session course is concerned with analyzing factory costs, particularly 
overhead and indirect expense, in order to obtain better allocation of costs product-wise. 
Class is conducted in seminar form. 

SP 163. Fundamentals of Finance for Non-Financial Executives 

This course is designed for the company executive, administrator or professional 
specialist who, with little or no background in financing and accounting concepts, needs 
to operate in a financially oriented corporate structure. Course attempts to offer help 
and guidance in understanding and using the financial concepts that are of primary 
influence on business activity. No prior knowledge of finance presumed for this fifteen- 
week course. 

SP 165. Understanding Investments 

A 15-session course designed to present a survey of the investment field for the non- 
professional investor. Course will cover fundamental types of securities, securities markets, 
evaluation and analysis of company reports, mutual funds, stock splits and other related 
topics. No prior knowledge of investments needed. 

SP 1 66. General Freight Traffic Management 

Purpose of this 30-session course is to provide a thorough grounding in the funda- 
mentals involved in the movement of freight, with special emphasis on the duties of the 
industrial traffic manager. Techniques of traffic management are emphasized, involving 
treatment of such subjects as claims, bills of lading, carrier rules and regulations, freight 
rates throughout the country. 

SP 1 67. Motor Freight Traffic — Rates and TarifFs 

This is a comprehensive 30-session course giving actual training in motor carrier 
traffic management fundamentals, including detailed study of motor carrier rates, classi- 
fications and tariffs together with rate-making procedures. Emphasis is on tariffs used 
by the motor carrier industry in New England. 

SP 1 69. Modern Package Design and Materials 

This twelve-session course emphasizes the importance of package design in merchan- 
dising and reviews some of the current practices in the field of design and materials. Folding 
box manufacture is emphasized; attention is also focused upon the use of acetate films, 
polymeric materials, glass, and metal foil. Use of color, art work, layout and design, along 
with economy in packaging discussed. Of interest especially to package design engineers and 
assistants, advertising, merchandising and sales personnel. 



THE SCHOOL 

of 

EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



The School of Executive Development 

Staff Member in Charge: Lawrence C. Parker 



The School of Executive Development is a four-year training program 
to supplement the work experience of eligible managerial employees and 
to develop skills essential to executive action in firms of the New Haven 
area. 

Origin and Purpose 

The School of Executive Development at New Haven College originated 
in company requests, received over a period of several years, for a program 
of management studies for junior and middle level executives. With valu- 
able assistance from educators and industrialists of Worcester, Mass., where 
a similar program has operated successfully at Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, the College developed suggested instructional materials for a four-year 
program. This material was discussed with an advisory committee of in- 
dustrial training directors and at a meeting of 34 executives. Both groups 
expressed a need for the program, and the first class of 25 was started in 
January, 1953. Since that date, more than 250 men from over 40 companies 
have been admitted to the program which has been enthusiastically re- 
ceived by business and industry in Central Connecticut. 

This program brings together, for management studies under capable 
leadership, men from various companies and institutions who have posi- 
tions between the levels of departmental foremen and top management, or 
men who are next in line and are being prepared for departmental responsi- 
bility. These are in such departments as production, cost control, quality 
control, sales, methods, purchasing, industrial relations, engineering and 
accounting. The men, through working together, learn from each other and 
are stimulated to keep on learning. From their studies they are able to ob- 
tain meaning which was impossible for them to recognize in earlier school- 
ing. Furthermore, previous learning is refreshed at a time when the men are 
ready to use it. 

Schedule of Hours 

Classes are scheduled one day a week from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. 

Classes meet from September to May with customary school holidays 
observed. 

Admission Requirements 

Prospective enrollees in the program are nominated by the company 
and are admitted following approval by the College. 

102 



The School of Executive Development 103 

Membership is limited to 28 in each year's class. To be eligible to par- 
ticipate, a person must satisfy the following conditions: 

1. He must be a mature individual with experience in business or 
industry appropriate to the aims of the program. 

2. His level of employment should be assistant department head or 
higher. 

3. He must be nominated by his company, approved by the College, 
and show evidence of a desire to participate. 

4. He must show a likelihood of completing the four-year program. 

5. His job schedule must permit regular attendance. 

One to four participants from a company may be enrolled in any one 
beginning class, which then meets on the regular schedule over the four-year 
period. 

Organization of the Program 

The executive development program is guided by an 11-man advisory 
committee of executives from New Haven area business and industry. This 
committee reviews all development work and assists in the general operation 
of the School. 

Each class in the School elects its own steering committee to represent 
the participants in assisting the College with evaluation of content and pro- 
cedures and in the organization of social activities and special projects. 

Tuition 

The annual charge is $175.00 per man per year except for companies 
which have formal training agreements with the College, in which case the 
tuition is $125.00 per man per year. This fee includes tuition, books and 
supplies and all other course expense. 

Application 

Preference for enrollment in a new class is given to companies cur- 
rently participating providing that reservations are known to the College 
by mid-April, with final applications submitted not later than mid-May. 

Applications from new companies must be submitted by mid-May and 
will be considered in order of application as the class quota permits. 

First Year Courses of Study 

Effective Self-Expression is a course in speech, conference training, and 
committee participation. It is speech studied in terms of expressing 
oneself in everyday situations to meet ordinary business needs. 
Speed Reading improves reading speed and comprehension, helps ad- 
just reading to differing conditions and purposes, and develops skill in 
reading technical and business material. 



104 New Haven College 



Second Year 



Human Relations in Industry affords an examination of a series of 
inter-personal situations to bring out the factors involved, and to il- 
lustrate effective techniques which were, or might have been, utilized 
in each case. 

Economics is a study of several of the pressing national and inter- 
national problems facing our economy, such as rapid growth, inflation, 
taxes, national debt, rearmament, the inter-nation challenge of socialism 
and communism, and aid to other countries. 



Third Year 

Economics of the Firm examines the problems of the firm and the 
national economy and studies the functions of management, the cor- 
porate structure, types of business, organization, and such problems as 
the use of patents, the relation of the firm to the community, and cer- 
tain effects of government regulations. 

Production Management traces the problem from product design, plant 
layout, and work flow to methods improvement, and finally to schedul- 
ing and control. 

Buying and Selling Practices provides an insight into the marketing and 
procurement problems of the firm as they relate to production. 

Fourth Year 

Personnel Administration affords an opportunity to study problems of 
manpower management, including federal and state regulation of em- 
ployment practices, medical and personal services, and the implications 
of a contractual relationship with the workers. 

Policy Formulation and Administration examines problems of policy 
writing and affords the student a review of the materials studied 
throughout the entire program. 



The School of Executive Development 105 



School of Executive Developmenf Advisory Committee 

A. C. Gilbert, Jr., Chairman, President, The A. C. Gilbert Company, New 
Haven, Connecticut 



Frederick T. Backstrom, President, First Federal Savings and Loan Associa- 
tion of New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut 

William J. Cooper, President, The United Illuminating Company, New 
Haven, Connecticut 



John A. Dickie, President, Unholtz-Dickie Corporation, Hamden, Connecti- 
cut 



John J. Grimes^ Jr., General Superintendent, New Haven and Trenton, 
American Steel and Wire Co., Division of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration, New Haven, Connecticut 

W. Miller Hurley, Vice President and General Manager, Winchester- 
Western Division, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation, New Haven, 
Connecticut 

Harold F. Kneen, President, Safety Industries, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut 

Gen Mastrogiovanni, Manager of Employment and Training, B. F. Good- 
rich Sponge Products Division, Shelton, Connecticut 

Ellis C. Maxcy, Administrative Vice President, The Southern New Eng- 
land Telephone Company, New Haven, Connecticut 

Joseph S. Miller, President, The New Haven Board and Carton Company, 
New Haven, Connecticut 

William B. Willla.ms, Secretary and Treasurer, Acme Wire Company, New 
Haven, Connecticut 



THE 

READING CENTER 



New Haven College, 1960-1961 



New Haven College 

THE READING CENTER 

Staff Member in Charge: Joseph J. Arnold 



Aims and Objectives 

Of great significance is the fact that a large number of secondary and 
college students are seriously deficient in many aspects of reading. This de- 
ficiency is equally significant in the world where the demands of an increas- 
ingly complex society require a greater amount of reading. 

It is the aim of the New Haven College Reading Center to ofiEer a 
varied program of reading techniques and study skills to fit the specific 
needs of students and adults. The program is divided into two major divi- 
sions namely: developmental and remedial. The developmental program 
is designed for classroom group teaching techniques on the secondary, 
college, and adult levels. The remedial program is more individualized 
consisting of a thorough individual testing and diagnosis. Remedial in- 
struction will be in small groups of 4 to 6 pupils or individually, if neces- 
sary. 

Admission of Students 

Since Reading Center courses do not carry college credit, admission is 
open to those whose test results, as well as the personal interview, indicate 
that they will profit from the instruction. 

Those interested in seeking admission should apply in person. Regis- 
tration information will be mailed on request. Enrollment is in the order 
in which registrations are received. 

Remedial Reading Students must have completed the first grade. 



Testing Program 

Tests are a prerequisite to admittance. Although the written tests will 
vary with the level of the group, they are designed to measure such basic 
phases of reading as speed, comprehension, vocabulary, concentration, and 
retention. 

Wherever feasible, correlated testing is administered at the end of each 
course to determine the level of accomplishment in each reading area. 



Tuition Charges, Payments and Refunds 
Developmental Reading Courses 

Tuition for all courses is $60.00. This charge includes all testing fees. 
A complete refund of tuition will be made, except for the initial testing 
fee of $3.00, to those students not accepted. 

108 



The Reading Center 109 

Tuition for Remedial Reading 

Group Instruction (3 to 6 students) $125.00— 5-week course; Individual Tutor- 
ing $250.00— 5-week course; Partial Tutoring with Group Instruction $10.00 
per session for partial individual tutoring. The balance of group instruction 
will be prorated on the group instruction tuition. 
Tution includes all testing and diagnostic services as well as all materials. 

Course Descriptions 
Developmental Reading Courses 

Reading 1 — Development Reading and Study Skills — Secondary Level 

This course is designed specifically for the secondary school student. Besides the usual 
improvement in better and faster reading, much emphasis is placed on developing proficiency 
in the organizational techniques of scheduling and timing and on the study skills of find- 
ing and organizing information. The techniques of taking examinations are also offered. 

Reading II — Reading Laboratory. 

This course is designed to meet the reading and study skills needs of the entering 
college freshman, particularly those students whose college entrance examinations are 
low in this field. Development of reading speed and comprehension to meet the demands 
of the college reading level is stressed. Emphasis is also placed on the organizational and 
study skills of Survey Q 3 R techniques of outlining, skimming and scanning, vocabulary 
building and concentration. Special effort is made to improve concept building and 
critical interpretation. 

Reading III — Adult Reading Efficiency — Primary. 

This course is for the adult who wishes to develop his reading speed and compre- 
hension to his true potential. This course provides training in the ability to retain what 
has been read, to find the central idea and subordinate details, to make deductions, to 
evaluate evidence as well as other factors of the critical attitude necessary for mature 
interpretation. 

Reading IV — Adult Reading Efficiency — Advanced. 

This course is a continuation of Reading III in which the integrated program of 
increased reading speed and comprehension is further refined. 

In-Plant Reading 

This course is essentially Reading III in content, with modifications designed to fit 
the needs and interests of business and industrial personnel. 

Remedial Reading Courses 

The specific area of study depends entirely on the diagnosis and consequent recom- 
mendations in the reading analysis. Levels of instruction range from the primary grades 
through High School. As nearly as possible, students will be grouped with other students 
of the same age. 

Texts 

Correlated texts are used with all the courses. The material varies with each course. 
The materials used in Reading I, for example, are designed so that the student keeps the 
texts as a permanent record and a source of review. In such an instance the student is 
expected to pay for the texts. 



110 New Haven College 

Equipment 

The tachistoscope (flashmeter), the controlled reader, reading accelerators and the 
film series are all used in varying degrees in the Developmental Reading courses. 

Schedule of Sessions and Hours 

Developmental Reading Courses 

All courses are offered in 15 sessions. Each session is two hours in length 

During the school year Reading II, III, and IV meet once a week from 7:00 to 9:00 
p.m. and are scheduled from Mondays through Fridays. Reading I meets Saturday morn- 
ings from 9:30 to 11:30. 

During the summer session Reading I classes meet three times a week at 9:30 a.m. 
from Monday to Friday for five weeks to begin in late-June. Summer session classes for 
Reading II, III and IV also meet three times per week from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

Remedial Reading 

This program is limited to the summer session which begins in late June and runs 
for five weeks. 

Classes are held five mornings per week, Mondays through Friday. 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



New Haven College, 196O-I96I 



NEW HAVEN COLLEGE FACULTY 

Evening Credit Program 

1959-1960 

Andersen, Carl W. . Sociology 

A.B., University of North Carolina; M.A., Columbia University 
Housing Manager, Housing Authority of City of New Haven 

Arnold, Joseph J. Industrial Engineering 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Assistant Chairman, Industrial Engineering, New Haven College 

Bennett, Stephen J. Humanities-Literature 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
Chairman, Department of General Studies 

Berney, Charlotte English 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., University of Michigan 

Bielaus, John A. Calculus 

B.S., Purdue University 
Process Development Engineer, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. 

Bowden, Carleton L. Mathematics and Mechanics 

B.E., Yale University 
Process Engineer, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 

Bowman, Fred E. Engineering Physics 

B.S., Ph.D., Purdue University 
Eng. Specialist, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation 

Boyd, Roger W. Engineering Drawing 

B.S., Yale University 
Power Engineer, The United Illuminating Company 

Breese, James L. Tool Design 

Rhode Island School of Design, Brown University 
Plant Engineer, The Henry G. Thompson & Son Co. 

Brouwer, Frederick E. Humanities 

B.A., Calvin College, Grand Rapids 
M.A., University of Michigan 

BuDRow, Russell B. Engineering Physics 

B.E., Renssalaer Polytechnic Institute 
Division Distribution Engineer, The United Illuminating Company 

Cayley, Paul W. Mathematics 

B.E., M.Eng., Yale University 
Electrical Engineering, Yale University 

112 



Faculty 



113 



Electrical Engineering 



Chen, Vincent Political Science 

LL.B., National Chung Cheng University 
A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Yale University 
Chairman of Dept., Political Science, Albertus Magnus College 

Cohen, Sidney R. 

B.A., B.S.E., M.S., University of Connecticut 

Project Engineer, MB Electronics, Division of Textron 
Dresser^ W. Robert Engineering 

S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

M, Eng., Yale University 

Chairman, Department of Engineering, New Haven College 

Dudley, Edwin Mathematics 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Yale University 
Mathematics Instructor, North Haven High School 

Fischer, Frederick F. Accounting and Taxes 

B.S., Northeastern University 
Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 



Fischer, Frederick G. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Manager of Ernst & Ernst 

Fischer, Lewis C. 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Ernst & Ernst 

Fitzgerald, William J. 

A.S., New Haven College 

Mechanical Engineer, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Mechanical Processing 



Electrical Engineering 



Fletcher, Raymond A. 

B.S.E., University of Connecticut 

Assistant Engineer, Southern New England Telephone Co. 

Fornal, Peter P. Management Survey 

B.B.A., St. John's University; M.I.L.R., Cornell University 
Employment Manager, American Cyanamid Company, Wallingford 

Frickenhaus, Roland Accounting 

A.S. in Accounting, New Haven College 
Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Management and Systems Consultant 

Gagliardi, Robert M. 

B.S. in Elec. Engineering, University of Connecticut 

M. Eng., Yale University 

Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Yale University 

GiLMAN, LeIGHTON C. 

B.A., University of New Hampshire 

Public Relations Dept., Southern New England Telephone Co 



Mathematics 



Public Relations 



114 New Haven College 

Grave, Alexandra H. Spanish 

B.A., Mt. Holyoke College 

Harman, Henry M., Jr. Business Finance 

B.S., Lehigh University; M.A., University of Tulsa; C.P.A., Penna. 
Controller, Connecticut Hard Rubber Company 

Healey, Arthur H. Law 

B.A., Trinity College; LL.B., Harvard Law School 
Attorney-at-Law 

Heath, John M. Mathematics 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Yale University 
Head of Mathematics Dept., Hopkins Grammar School 

Hirschberg, Paul S. Business Administration 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut 
Assistant Chairman of Business Administration, New Haven College 

Hoffman, Henry H. Nuclear Physics 

B.S., Michigan College of Mining and Technology 
M.S., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 
Nuclear Fuels Research Labs, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. 

Hunt, Leigh W. Engineering Drawing 

Former Assistant Chief Draftsman, Safety Electrical Equip. Corp. 

Iaccarino, Carl J. Mathematics 

A.S., New Haven College 
Electrical Engineer, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

Jardine, Thomas Industrial Engineering 

B.E., M.S., University of Florida 
Industrial Engineer, American Cyanamid Co. 

Jensen, Jack W. English, Speech 

B.S., University of Minnesota 
Yale Divinity School 

Johannsen, Courtland E. Illumination 

B.A., M.A., University of Iowa Philosophy 

Advanced Study, Yale University 

Johnson, Richard C. Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Trinity College 
Mathematics Instructor, Westport School System 

Kafes, Patricia Psychology 

B.A., Swarthmore College; M.S., Yale University 

Kaplan, Phillip S. Economics— Speech 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University 

Kirk, William F. Metallurgical Engineering 

B.M., New York University; M.E., New York University 
Technician Specialist, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. 



Faculty 115 

KusLAN, Louis I. Modern Science 

B.S., University of Connecticut 
M.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Yale University 
Assoc. Professor Physical Sciences, Southern Conn. State College 

Landing, Albert A. Mathematics 

B.S., Civil Engineering, University of Connecticut 
Civil Engineer, Genovese and Associates 

Langewisch, Paul I. Engineering Physics 

B.S. in E.E., Bucknell University 

Superintendent of Distribution, Center Division, United 
Illuminating Co. 

Lippa, Shepherd Fluid Mechanics 

B.E., College of the City of New York 
M.S., University of Michigan 
Manager, Process Engineering, B. F. Goodrich Sponge Products Div. 

Lyons, William J., Jr. Electrical Engineering 

S.B., Electrical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Engineer, Southern New England Telephone Company 

Maeder, John R, Mathematics 

B.E., Yale University 
Project Engineer, M.B. Electronics Division of Textron 

McGregor, Robert M. Cost and Production Control 

B.A., University of Maine 
Manufacturers' Representative, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

McKernan, Gerald English 

B.A., College of the Holy Cross 
Public Relations, International Paper Company 

Michaels, Kenneth G. Mathematics 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College 
M.A., University of Connecticut 
Mathematics Instructor, North Haven High School 

NoRDQuisT, Roger F. English 

B.A., Park College; B.D., Yale University 
Yale Graduate Student 

NowAK, George J. Accounting 

B.S., American International College 

M.B.A., Wharton School of Finance, University of Pennsylvania 
Certified Public Accountant 

O'Dea, John J. Accounting 

B.B.A., St. Bonaventure University 
Auditor, The Colonial Bank & Trust Co. 

Offredi, Gene T. Accounting 

B.S., University of Connecticut 
Auditing and Methods, The United Illuminating Company 



116 New Haven College 

Orlando, Rocco Mathematics 

B.A., University of Connecticut 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College; M.A., Fairfield University 
Principal, Amity Junior High School 

Osborne, Lorraine English 

B.A., University of New Hampshire 
M.A., University of Connecticut 

Parker, Lawrence C. Tech. Report Writing 

A.B., Bates College; M.A., Tufts University 
Industrial Coordinator, New Haven College 

Rabinow, DAvm Engineering Economics 

B.S., The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art 
M.A., Cornell University 
Director of Engineering, The A. C. Gilbert Co. 

Reid, Richard M. Management Survey 

B.A., Ursinus College 
Assistant Division Manager, Seamless Rubber Co. 

Reimer, Richard Accounting 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; M.S., Columbia University 
C.P.A., State of Connecticut 
Ernst & Ernst 

Reiter, Stanley F. Chairman, Metallurgical Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M. Eng., D. Eng., Yale University 
Technical Manager, Rome Fastener Corporation 

Salmon, John H, Machine Design 

B.E., Yale University 

Supervisor of Operations, Power Plant, The United Illuminating 
Company 

Sandomirsky, Alexander G. Thermodynamics 

B.A., M.A., Cambridge University, England 
Manager of Engineering, Texfoam, B. F. Goodrich Sponge 
Products Div. 

ScHAEFFER, George A. Marketing and Sales 

B.S., University of Rochester 
Sales Engineer, National U. S. Radiator Co. 

Seaman, Ayres C. Mechanics 

B.S., C.E., Swarthmore College 
Chief Structural Engineer, Fletcher-Thompson Inc. 

Siegel, Irwin Business Administration 

B.A., M.A., Yale University; M.S., Columbia University 
Chairman, Department of Business Administration, New Haven College 

Sletten, David Industrial Safety 

A.S., New Haven College 
Supervising Engineer, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company 



Faculty 



117 



Smith, W. Reed, Jr. Psychology 

B.A., Marietta College Human Relations in Mgmt. 

Operations Research Analyst, Naugatuck Chemical Div., 
U. S. Rubber Co. 



Spang, H. Austin, III 

B.E., M.Eng., Yale University 
Research Engineer, Yale University 

Spang, Thomas 

B.E., M.Eng., Yale University 
Research Engineer, Yale University 

Stolwyjck, Jan 

M.S., Ph.D., Wageningen University, Holland 
Research Engineer, John R. Pierce Foundation 

Stone, Harris P. 

A.B., Brown University 
Tax Assessor, North Haven 

SucHY, Anthony J. 

A.S., New Haven College 

Comptroller, Connecticut Blue Cross, Inc. 



Mathematics 



Electrical Engineering 



Electrical Engineering 



Engineering Drawing 



Office Org. & Mgmt. 



Mathematics 



Tangoren, Ali Ihsan 

B.S., M.S., Louisiana State University 

Gun Design Engineer, Arms Research, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. 



Tiernan, George R. 

B.A., Yale University; L.L.B., Cornell University 
Attorney— Prosecuting Attorney Court of Common Pleas 

Trippett, Richard J. 

B.A.Sc, M.A.Sc, University of Toronto 

Design Engineer, MB Electronics Division of Textron, Inc. 



Law 



Mathematics 



Turner, Porter 

B.A., Maryville College 

General Secretary of the YMCA, New Haven 

Walker, Carlton 

B,S., University of Illinois 

Sales Engineer, U. S. Electrical Motors, Inc. 



History of the YMCA 



Electrical Engineering 



Warner, Thomas C, Jr. 
B.E., Yale University 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Chief Div. Eng., Electro-Mech., MB Electronics Division of 
Textron, Inc. 



Mathematics 



Waszmer, Roger F. 

B.E.E., Rensselaer Poly. Tech. 

Assistant Power Engineer, United Illuminating Co. 



Engineering Physics 



118 New Haven College 

Watson, Philip B. Management Courses 

S.B., Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Chairman, Department of Industrial Engineering, New Haven College 

Wellisch, Eric Chemistry 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University 

M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Purdue University 
Project Leader, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. 

YouDEN, Robert H. Electrical Engineering 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Chief Applications Engineer, Sperry Semiconductor Division, 
Sperry-Rand Corp. 

Zilveti, Halina J. Speech 

B.S., Boston University; M.A., Columbia University 
Speech and Hearing Therapist, New Haven Board of Education 



COLLEGE-COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 
Faculty 1959-60 

Booth, C. E. Mathematics 

Ph.B., Yale University Pratt-Read Program 

Registered Professional Engineer; Consultant, Westcott & Mapes, Inc. 

KossACK, Carl R. Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Yale University Pratt-Read Program 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Southern Connecticut State 
College 

Murphy, Patrick V. Intro, to Police Science 

B.A., St. Johns University Police Administration Program 

M.A., City College of N. Y. 
Attended F.B.I. Academy 
Lieutenant and Training Officer, New York City Police Academy 

RiELLo, AcHiLLE Speech 

B.S., Emerson College Police Administration Program 

M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Speech Correctionist and Hearing Therapist, New Haven Board of 
Education 



DAYTIME COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 
Faculty 1959-60 

Abrams, Floyd Speech 

B.A., Cornell University 
Student— Yale Law School 

Bennett, Stephen J. Humanities and English 

B.S., A.M., Columbia University 

Chairman, Department of General Studies, New H^en College 

Booth, C. E. Mathematics 

Ph.B., Yale University Pratt-Read Program 

Registered Professional Engineer; Consultant, Westcott & Mapes, Inc. 

Chen, Vincent Political Science 

L.L.B., National Chung Cheng University 

A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., Yale University 

Chairman of Dept., Political Science, Albertus Magnus College 

HiRSCHBERG, Paul S. Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut Orientation 

Assistant Chairman of Business Administration, New Haven College 

Jensen, Jack W. English and Speech 

B.S., University of Minnesota 
Yale Divinity School— B.D. student 

KusLAN, Louis Modern Science 

B.S., University of Connecticut 

M.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Yale University 

Associate Professor of Physical Sciences, Southern Connecticut 

State College 

Ormrod, Donald R. Physical Education, 

B.S., University of Massachusetts Director of Athletics 

Assistant Director of Physical Education, New Haven YMCA 

Osborne, Lorraine English 

B.A., University of New Hampshire 
M.A., University of Connecticut 

Singh, Premjit Sociology 

B.A., Panjab University; LL.B., Delhi University 
LL.M., Yale University 

119 



DAYTIME ENGINEERING PROGRAM 
Faculty 1959-60 

Bennett, Stephen J. English, Humanities 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
Chairman, Department of General Studies, New Haven College 

Colton, George W. Mathematics, Mechanics 

Ph.B., Sheffield Scientific School, Yale University 
Consulting Engineer 

Dresser, W. Robert Orientation, Engineering 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
M. Eng., Yale University 
Chairman, Department of Engineering, New Haven College 

Hunt, Leigh W. Engineering Drawing 

Former Assistant Chief Draftsman, Safety Electrical Equip. Corp. 

Hutchinson, Allen C. Economics 

B.A., Bates College; M.A., New Jersey State Teacher's College 
Ph.D., University of Texas 
Dean of New Haven College 

Kafes, William O. Speech 

B.A., Swarthmore College 
Student, Yale Law School 

Kaplan, Phillip S. Economics, Speech 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University 

Kritz, Arnold H. Mathematics 

Sc.B,, Brown University; M.S., Yale University 

McDonald, Richard A. Physics 

B.E., M.E., Yale University 

Ormrod, Donald R. Physical Education 

B.S., University of Massachusetts 
Assistant Director of Athletics, New Haven Y.M.C.A. 

Osborne, Lorraine English 

B.A., University of New Hampshire 
M.A., University of Connecticut 

Singh, Premjit Sociology 

B.A., Panjab University; LL.B., Delhi University 
LL.M., Yale University 

Smith, Philip A. Chemistry 

Ph.B. Chemistry, Yale University - 

120 



DIVISION OF SPECIAL STUDIES 

Faculty, 1959-1960 

Banks, J. Richard Creative Writing Workshop 

Columbia University 
Associate Director, Yale University News Bureau 

Booth, C. E. Professional Engineers Examination Refresher Course 

Ph.B., Yale University 
Registered Professional Engineer; Consultant, Westcott & Mapes, Inc. 

Bunker^ Howard Q. Basic Principles of Purchasing 

B.B.A., Boston University; M.B.A., Boston University 
Assistant Professor of Business Education, Central Connecticut State 
College, New Britain, Connecticut 

Callahan, Francis H., Jr. Micromotion Study 

B.S., University of Connecticut 
Chief Industrial Engineer, Bradley Semiconductors, Inc. 

Criscuolo, Michael Time Study Methods 

New Haven College 

Cost Control and Production Control Manager, 
The A. C. Gilbert Company 

Croker, William F., Sr. Motor Freight Traffic 

University of Chicago; Hillyer College 
Assistant Traffic Manager, The Adley Express Company 

Fornal, Peter Paul Personnel Interviewing 

B.B.A., St. John's University; M.I.L.R., Cornell University 
Employment Manager, American Cyanamid Company, Wallingford 

Hayes, F. Albert Advanced Industrial Purchasing 

Harvard University 

Materials Management Counsel, formerly Vice President for Purchasing, 
Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Company, New York 

Hedges, John B. General Freight Traffic Management 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Certification, Traffic Managers' Institute, N. Y. 
Traffic and Export Manager, Manufacturers Association of 
Connecticut, Hartford 

Herder, John H. Business Games 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Columbia University 
Ph.D., New York University 

Supervisor of Education, The Southern New England Telephone 
Company, New Haven 

Holtzinger, W. Jackson Cost Control for Better Management 

Dickinson College 
Formerly Executive Standards Engineer, Farrel Birmingham Company 

121 



122 New Haven College 

Maki, Charles Servomechanism Components 

B.S. in E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Chief Development Engineer, MB Electronics 

Martha, Paul M. Methods-Time-Measurement 

University of Connecticut 
Chief Industrial Engineer, Greist Manufacturing Company 

McCrillis^ John O. C. Graphic Arts and Design 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design 
M.F.A., Yale University School of Fine Arts 
Assistant Typographer, Yale University Press 

Murray, William K. Electroplating 

B.Ch.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Manager of Marketing, Enthone, Inc. 

Parker, Lawrence C. Public Speaking for Business 

A.B., Bates College; M.A., Tufts University 
Staff Director, The School of Executive Development, 
New Haven College 

Plumley, Frank Advanced Industrial Purchasing 

B.S. in C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology' 
Purchasing and Transportation Manager, Olin Mathieson 
Chemical Corporation 

RiCHTER, Frederick B. Psychology of Management 

A.S., New Haven College 
Division Trainer, Ansonia Division, American Brass Company 

Sizer, Alvin V. News and Feature Writing 

B.A., Brown University 
Assistant Managing Editor, New Haven Register 

Stern, Frank I. Understanding Investments 

B.S.S., City College, New York; M.A., Columbia University 
Assistant General Manager, Traffic Research, 
The New Haven Railroad 

Turning^ Walter A. Elementary Data Processing 

A.S., New Haven College Advance Data Processing 

Methods Accountant and Analyst, City of New Haven 

Washburn, Edward B. Electroplating 

B.A., Brown University 
Supervisor of Technical Services, Enthone, Inc. 

Woerheide, Arthur W. Production Control 

Fundamentals of Inventory Management 
L.L.B., Washington University 

Production Control Manager, Winchester- Western Division, 
New Haven and East Alton, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation 

YouDEN^ Robert H. Transistor Electronics 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Columbia University 
Chief Applications Engineer, Sperry Semiconductor Division, 
Sperry Rand Corporation 



SCHOOL OF EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT 
Faculty 1959-1960 

Bauer, Eleanor Harvey Effective Self-Expression 

B.L.I. , Emerson College; M.A., New York University 
Speech Correctionist and Hearing Therapist, Board of Education, 
City of New Haven 

Bush, Frederick J. Production Management 

M.E., M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology 

Christian, Rena G. Speed Reading 

B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin; Kings College, London 

Fornal, Peter P. Human Relations 

B.B.A., St. John's Unversity; M.I.L.R., Cornell University 
Employment Manager, American Cyanamid Company, Wallingford 

GiBBS, Richard Buying and Selling Practices 

B.S., Haverford College 

Vice-President and General Manager, United Advertising 
Corporation 

Martin, Everett W. Effective Self-Expression 

B.S., Harvard University 
Director of Educational Projects, Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. 

Plumley, Frank Buying and Selling Practices 

B.S. in C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Purchasing and Transportation Manager, Olin Mathieson 
Chemical Corp. 

Roddy, Frank M. Personnel Administration 

B.A., Boston College 
Labor Supervisor, The American Brass Company, Ansonia Division 

TuMLiR, Jan V. Economics 

B.A., M.A., Yale University 
Economics Department, Yale University 

Walter, John T. Economics of the Firm 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology; M.A., Columbia University 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Coordinator of Distribution Planning and Control, 
Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. 

Watson, P. B. Policy Formulation and Administration 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Consultant, American Cyanamid Company, New York, N. Y. 
Chairman, Department of Industrial Engineering, New Haven College 

123 



READING CENTER PROGRAM 



Faculty 1959-1960 

Arnold, Joseph J. 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Director of Reading Center, New Haven College 

Burke, Mary 

B.S., Central Connecticut State College 
M.A., Fairfield University 
Instructor, Meriden Schools 



Reading 



Reading 



Reading 



Conway, Helen 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

M.A., Boston University 

Graduate of Durrell-Sullivan Educational Clinic, Boston University 

President of Connecticut Association for Reading Research 

Instructor, Southern Connecticut State College 

Reading Consultant, Fair Haven Junior High School 



Kennedy, Norine 

B.E., Southern Connecticut State College 

M.A., Columbia University 

Principal, Pequot School, Fairfield, Connecticut 



Reading 



Skolnick, Sidney 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut 

Reading Consultant, North Haven Public Schools 

Instructor, Graduate School in Southern Connecticut State College 



Reading 



124 



Index 



Associate Degree 


39 


Bachelor Degree 


47 


Description of Courses 


56 


Accreditations and Memberships 


18 


Admininstrative Staff 


7 


Admission and Application 




Daytime Cooperative Program 


74 


Daytime Engineering Program 


83 


Evening Credit Program 


28 


General 


17 


Alumni Association 


21 


Associate in Science Program (Evening] 


) 


Accounting 


39 


Business Administration 


39 


Engineering 




Electrical 


42 


General 


41 


Industrial 


43 


Mechanical 


44 


Metallurgical 


45 


Management 


40 


Program of General Studies 


38 


Athletic Activities 


20 


Attendance Regulations 


23 


Bachelor of Science Programs 


47 


Accounting 


47 


Business Administration 


48 


Industrial Engineering 


50 


Industrial Engineering— Electrical 


50 


Industrial Engineering— Mechanical 


53 


Industrial Engineering- 




Metallurgical 


54 


Industrial Management 


49 


Board of Governors 


7 


Board of Trustees 


7 


Business Administration 




Associate Degree 


39 


Bachelor Degree 


48 


Courses 


57 



Calendar 

All Degree Programs 

Daytime Cooperative Program 

Daytime Engineering Program 

Evening Credit Program 
College-Community Programs 

Cooperative Program, Daytime 

See Daytime 
Counseling and Guidance 
Creative Thinking 

Credit Programs 
General Description 

Daytime Cooperative Program 

Admission 

Aims and Objectives 

Calendar 

Description of Courses 

Employment 

Programs of Study 

Requirements for Degree 

Scholastic Regulations 

Study Period 

Tuition and Fees 

Work Period 
Daytime Engineering Program 

Admission 

Aims and Objectives 

Calendar 

Description of Courses 

Programs of Study 

Tuition and Fees 

Dean's List 

Description of Courses 
(Evening Credit) 

Division of Special Studies 

see Special Studies, Division of 

Divisions of the College 

Drawing and Design Courses 59, 

Electrical Engineering 
Associate Degree Program 



4 

72 

82 

26 

91, 92 

70 
18 
89 

16 

71 

74 
73 

72 

79, 80 

75. 76 

78 

75 

75 

73 

77 

74 

81 

83 

83 

82 

86-91 

84-86 

84 

23 

55-70 

93 

16 

90, 91 

42 



125 



Engineering 

Daytime Program 81 
Electrical, Associate Degree 

Program 42 
General, Associate Degree 

Program 38 
Industrial 

Associate Degree Program 43 

Bachelor Degree Programs 50 

Description of Courses 62 
Mechnical, Associate Degree 

Program 44 
Metallurgical, Associate Degree 

Program 45 
Professional Examination 

Refresher 96 

Society (Engineering) 19 

Evening Credit Program 25 

Aims and Objectives 27 

Admission 28 

Advanced Standing 29 
Associate in Science Programs 37-46 
Bachelor of Science Programs 47-52 

Calendar 26 

Classification of Students 30 

Description of Courses 55-70 

Faculty 111-118 

Placement Service 32 
Programs of Study 

Associate in Science 37-46 

Bachelor of Science 47-52 

Refunds 34 

Registration 31 

Schedule of Hours SI 

Subject Load 31 

Summer Session 36 

Transfer Students 29 

Tuition and Fees 32-35 
Executive Development 

see School of 101 



Faculty 

General Engineering, Associate 



111-124 



Degree Program 


41 


General Information 


15-24 


General Studies, Associate 




Degree Programs 


38 


Grading System 


21, 22 


Grants-in-Aid 


19 


History (of the College) 


9-13 


Honors 


24 


Industrial Engineering 




Associate Degree Programs 


43 


Bachelor Degree Programs 


50-54 


Description of Courses 


64 


Industrial Management 




Bachelor Degree Program 


49 


Library 


21 


Loans 


19 


Management Program, Associate 




Degree 


40 


Management, Industrial Program 




Bachelor Degree 


49 


Map 


2 


Mechanical Engineering Progiam, 




Associate Degree 


44 


Memberships, Accreditations and 


18 


Metallurgical Engineering Program, 


Associate Degree 


45 


New Haven College and Yale 




University 


17 


Newspaper, Student 


20 


Personnel Supervision Courses 


68. 90 


Probation 


22-23 


Physical Education, Coop & DEP 


78 


Physics Courses 


69 


Purposes and History (of the 




College) 


9-13 


Reading Center 


107-110 



126 



Refunds 




Registration Procedure 


94 


Evening Credit Program 


33 


Schedule of Hours 


94 


Requirements for the Degree 


24 


Standing Committees 




Scholarships and Grants-in-Aid 


19 


Board of Governors 

Staff 
Student Council 
Student Newspaper 
Student Personnel Services 
Summer Session 


8 
8 
19 
20 
18 
36 


Scholastic Regulations 

School of Executive Development 

Admission 

Advisory Committee 

Application 


21 
101 
102 
105 
103 


Course of Study 


103 


Testing 


18 


Origin and Purpose 
Organization of the Program 


102 
103 


Transfer Students 
Transferability of Credit 


24 
18 


Schedule of Hours 


102 


Tuition and Fees 




Tuition 


103 


Daytime Cooperative Program 


77 


Social Activities 


20 


Daytime Engineering Program 


84 


Social Studies Courses 


70 


Evening Credit Program 


32-35 


Special Studies, Division of 




Tuition Loan Funds 


19 


Admission Requirements 


94 


Veterans 


20-21 


Aims 


94 


Yale University, and New Haven 




Certificate Requirements 


94 


College 


17 


Description of Courses 


95 


Y.M.CA. Privileges 


20 



127 



CALENDAR FOR 1960 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



S M T W T F S 



1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 



5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 



S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F 5 

1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



CALENDAR FOR 1961 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



MAY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



S M T W T F 5 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 



26 27 28 



JUNE 



S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 



S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



JULY 



S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 2021 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F 5 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 1011 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 



S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 

AUGUST 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



128